Elbridge Thomas Gerry (; July 17, 1744 (O.S. July 6, 1744) – November 23, 1814) was an American politician and diplomat. As a Democratic-Republican he served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from March 1813 until his death in November 1814. The phenomenon of gerrymandering was named after him.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Elbridge Thomas Gerry (; July 17, 1744 (O.S. July 6, 1744) – November 23, 1814) was an American politician and diplomat. As a Democratic-Republican he served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from March 1813 until his death in November 1814. The phenomenon of gerrymandering was named after him. Born into a wealthy merchant family, Gerry vocally opposed British colonial policy in the 1760s, and was active in the early stages of organizing the resistance in the American Revolutionary War. Elected to the Second Continental Congress, Gerry signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation. He was one of three men who attended the Constitutional Convention in 1787 who refused to sign the United States Constitution because it did not then include a Bill of Rights. After its ratification he was elected to the inaugural United States Congress, where he was actively involved in drafting and passage of the Bill of Rights as an advocate of individual and state liberties. Gerry was at first opposed to the idea of political parties, and cultivated enduring friendships on both sides of the political divide between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans. He was a member of a diplomatic delegation to France that was treated poorly in the XYZ Affair, in which Federalists held him responsible for a breakdown in negotiations. Gerry thereafter became a Democratic-Republican, running unsuccessfully for Governor of Massachusetts several times before winning the office in 1810. During his second term, the legislature approved new state senate districts that led to the coining of the word "gerrymander"; he lost the next election, although the state senate remained Democratic-Republican. Chosen by Madison as his vice presidential candidate in 1812, Gerry was elected, but died a year and a half into his term. He is the only signer of the Declaration of Independence who is buried in Washington, DC. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-09-19 16:28:12Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 10293 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 53388 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-09-19 16:16:43Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 236 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 916582947 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:wordnet_type
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Elbridge Thomas Gerry (; July 17, 1744 (O.S. July 6, 1744) – November 23, 1814) was an American politician and diplomat. As a Democratic-Republican he served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from March 1813 until his death in November 1814. The phenomenon of gerrymandering was named after him. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Elbridge Gerry (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:gender
  • male (en)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:governor of
is dbo:parent of
is dbo:predecessor of
is dbo:relation of
is dbo:spouse of
is dbo:successor of
is dbo:vicePresident of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:vicepresident of
is foaf:primaryTopic of