During the American Revolution, those loyal to King George III of Great Britain came to be known as Loyalists. After Great Britain was defeated by the Americans and the French at Yorktown, the most active Loyalists were no longer welcome in the United States, and sought homes elsewhere in the British Empire. About 80%–90% of the Loyalists remained in the United States and enjoyed full citizenship there.

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  • During the American Revolution, those loyal to King George III of Great Britain came to be known as Loyalists. After Great Britain was defeated by the Americans and the French at Yorktown, the most active Loyalists were no longer welcome in the United States, and sought homes elsewhere in the British Empire. About 80%–90% of the Loyalists remained in the United States and enjoyed full citizenship there. Historians have estimated that between 15 and 20 percent of the white population of the colonies were Loyalists, or about 500,000 men, women and children.Jasanoff (2012) has issued new estimates of how many Loyalists departed the U.S. She calculates 60,000 whites in total. The majority of them—about 33,000—went to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, about 6600 went to Quebec, 2,000 to Prince Edward Island. About 5000 white Loyalists went to Florida, bringing along their slaves who numbered about 6500. About 13,000 went to Britain (and 5000 free blacks). The 60,000 or-so white departures represented about 10% of the Loyalist element.The departing Loyalists were offered free land in British North America. Many were prominent colonists whose ancestors had originally settled in the early 17th century, while a portion were recent settlers in the Thirteen Colonies with few economic or social ties. Many had their property confiscated by the rebels.Loyalists resettled in what was initially the Province of Quebec (including modern-day Ontario), and in Nova Scotia (including modern-day New Brunswick). Their arrival marked the arrival of an English-speaking population in the future Canada west and east of the Quebec border. Many Loyalists from the American South brought their slaves with them as slavery was also legal in Canada. An imperial law in 1790 assured prospective immigrants to Canada that their slaves would remain their property. However most black Loyalists were free, having been given their freedom from slavery by fighting for the British or joining British lines during the Revolution. The government helped them resettle in Canada as well, transporting nearly 3500 free blacks to New Brunswick. (en)
  • During the American Revolution, those who continued to support King George III of Great Britain came to be known as Loyalists. Loyalists are to be contrasted with Patriots, who supported the Revolution. Historians have estimated that during the American Revolution, between 15 and 20 percent of the white population of the colonies, or about 500,000 people, were Loyalists. As the war concluded with Great Britain defeated by the Americans and the French, the most active Loyalists were no longer welcome in the United States, and sought to move elsewhere in the British Empire. The large majority (about 80%–90%) of the Loyalists remained in the United States, however, and enjoyed full citizenship there.Jasanoff (2012) estimates that a total of 60,000 white settlers left the new United States. The majority of them—about 33,000—went to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, about 6,600 went to Quebec, and 2,000 to Prince Edward Island. About 5,000 white Loyalists went to Florida, bringing along their slaves who numbered about 6,500. About 13,000 went to Great Britain (along with 5,000 free blacks). The 60,000 white departures represented about 10% of the original Loyalist population.. A recent study increases the estimate to the traditional figure of 100,000 (Thomas B. Allen, Tories Fighting for the King in America, America's First Civil War, 2010, Harper, pp. 19-20, 34-36).The departing Loyalists were offered free land in British North America. Many were prominent colonists whose ancestors had originally settled in the early 17th century, while a portion were recent settlers in the Thirteen Colonies with few economic or social ties. Many had their property confiscated by Patriots. 30000 Americans lured by the promise of land upon swearing loyalty to the King voluntarily moved to Ontario in the 1790s.Loyalists resettled in what was initially the Province of Quebec (including modern-day Ontario), and in Nova Scotia (including modern-day New Brunswick). Their arrival marked the arrival of an English-speaking population in the future Canada west and east of the Quebec border. Many Loyalists from the American South brought their slaves with them as slavery was also legal in Canada. An imperial law in 1790 assured prospective immigrants to Canada that their slaves would remain their property. However most black Loyalists were free, having been given their freedom from slavery by fighting for the British or joining British lines during the Revolution. The government helped them resettle in Canada as well, transporting nearly 3,500 free blacks to New Brunswick. (en)
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  • During the American Revolution, those loyal to King George III of Great Britain came to be known as Loyalists. After Great Britain was defeated by the Americans and the French at Yorktown, the most active Loyalists were no longer welcome in the United States, and sought homes elsewhere in the British Empire. About 80%–90% of the Loyalists remained in the United States and enjoyed full citizenship there. (en)
  • During the American Revolution, those who continued to support King George III of Great Britain came to be known as Loyalists. Loyalists are to be contrasted with Patriots, who supported the Revolution. Historians have estimated that during the American Revolution, between 15 and 20 percent of the white population of the colonies, or about 500,000 people, were Loyalists. (en)
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  • Expulsion of the Loyalists (en)
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