Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Father Le Loutre’s War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the British and New England colonists were led by British Officer Charles Lawrence and New England Ranger John Gorham. On the other side, Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadia militia in guerrilla warfare against settlers and British forces. (At the outbreak of the war there were an estimated 3,000 Mi'kmaq and 12,000 Acadians in the region.)While the British Conquest of Acadia in 1710, the Mi'kmaq and Acadians continued to contain the British to settlements at Port Royal and Canso. The rest of the colony was in the control of the Catholic Mi'kmaq and Acadians. About forty years later, the British made a concerted effort to settle Protestants in the region and to establish military control over all of Nova Scotia and present-day New Brunswick, igniting armed response from Acadians in Father Le Loutre's War. The British settled 3,229 people in Halifax during the first years. This exceeded the number of Mi'kmaq in the entire region and was seen as a threat to the traditional occupiers of the land. The Mi'kmaq and some Acadians resisted the arrival of these Protestant settlers.The war caused unprecedented upheaval in the area. Atlantic Canada witnessed more population movements, more fortification construction, and more troop allocations than ever before. Twenty-four conflicts were recorded (battles, raids, skirmishes) during the war, 13 of which were Mi'kmaq and Acadian raids on the capital region Halifax/ Dartmouth. As typical of frontier warfare, many additional conflicts were unrecorded.During Father Le Loutre's War, the British attempted to establish firm control of the major Acadian settlements in peninsular Nova Scotia and to extend their control to the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. The British also wanted to establish Protestant communities in Nova Scotia. During the war, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq left Nova Scotia for the French colonies of Ile St. Jean (Prince Edward Island) and Ile Royale (Cape Breton Island). The French also tried to maintain control of the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. (Father Le Loutre tried to prevent the New Englanders from moving into present-day New Brunswick just as a generation earlier, during Father Rale's War, Rale tried to prevent New Englanders from taking over present-day Maine.) Throughout the war, the Mi’kmaq and Acadians attacked the British forts in Nova Scotia and the newly established Protestant settlements. They wanted to retard British settlement and buy time for France to implement its Acadian resettlement scheme.The war began with the British unilaterally establishing Halifax, which was a violation of an earlier treaty with the Mi'kmaq (1726), signed after Father Rale's War. In response, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq orchestrated attacks at Chignecto, Grand Pré, Dartmouth, Canso, Halifax and Country Harbour. The French erected forts at present-day Saint John, Chignecto and Port Elgin, New Brunswick. The British responded by attacking the Mi'kmaq and Acadians at Mirligueche (later known as Lunenburg), Chignecto and St. Croix. The British unilaterally established communities in Lunenburg and Lawrencetown. Finally, the British erected forts in Acadian communities located at Windsor, Grand Pre and Chignecto. The war ended after six years with the defeat of the Mi'kmaq, Acadians and French in the Battle of Fort Beausejour. (en)
  • Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the British and New England colonists were led by British Officer Charles Lawrence and New England Ranger John Gorham. On the other side, Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadia militia in guerrilla warfare against settlers and British forces. (At the outbreak of the war there were an estimated 3,000 Mi'kmaq and 12,000 Acadians in the region.)While the British Siege of Port Royal in 1710, the Mi'kmaq and Acadians continued to contain the British to settlements at Port Royal and Canso. The rest of the colony was in the control of the Catholic Mi'kmaq and Acadians. About forty years later, the British made a concerted effort to settle Protestants in the region and to establish military control over all of Nova Scotia and present-day New Brunswick, igniting armed response from Acadians in Father Le Loutre's War. The British settled 3,229 people in Halifax during the first years. This exceeded the number of Mi'kmaq in the entire region and was seen as a threat to the traditional occupiers of the land. The Mi'kmaq and some Acadians resisted the arrival of these Protestant settlers.The war caused unprecedented upheaval in the area. Atlantic Canada witnessed more population movements, more fortification construction, and more troop allocations than ever before. Twenty-four conflicts were recorded (battles, raids, skirmishes) during the war, 13 of which were Mi'kmaq and Acadian raids on the capital region Halifax/ Dartmouth. As typical of frontier warfare, many additional conflicts were unrecorded.During Father Le Loutre's War, the British attempted to establish firm control of the major Acadian settlements in peninsular Nova Scotia and to extend their control to the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. The British also wanted to establish Protestant communities in Nova Scotia. During the war, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq left Nova Scotia for the French colonies of Ile St. Jean (Prince Edward Island) and Ile Royale (Cape Breton Island). The French also tried to maintain control of the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. (Father Le Loutre tried to prevent the New Englanders from moving into present-day New Brunswick just as a generation earlier, during Father Rale's War, Rale tried to prevent New Englanders from taking over present-day Maine.) Throughout the war, the Mi’kmaq and Acadians attacked the British forts in Nova Scotia and the newly established Protestant settlements. They wanted to retard British settlement and buy time for France to implement its Acadian resettlement scheme.The war began with the British unilaterally establishing Halifax, which was a violation of an earlier treaty with the Mi'kmaq (1726), signed after Father Rale's War. In response, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq orchestrated attacks at Chignecto, Grand Pré, Dartmouth, Canso, Halifax and Country Harbour. The French erected forts at present-day Saint John, Chignecto and Port Elgin, New Brunswick. The British responded by attacking the Mi'kmaq and Acadians at Mirligueche (later known as Lunenburg), Chignecto and St. Croix. The British unilaterally established communities in Lunenburg and Lawrencetown. Finally, the British erected forts in Acadian communities located at Windsor, Grand Pre and Chignecto. The war ended after six years with the defeat of the Mi'kmaq, Acadians and French in the Battle of Fort Beausejour. (en)
  • Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the British and New England colonists were led by British Officer Charles Lawrence and New England Ranger John Gorham. On the other side, Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadia militia in guerrilla warfare against settlers and British forces. (At the outbreak of the war there were an estimated 3,000 Mi'kmaq and 12,000 Acadians in the region.)While the British Siege of Port Royal in 1710, the Mi'kmaq and Acadians continued to contain the British to settlements at Port Royal and Canso. The rest of the colony was in the control of the Catholic Mi'kmaq and Acadians. About forty years later, the British made a concerted effort to settle Protestants in the region and to establish military control over all of Nova Scotia and present-day New Brunswick, igniting armed response from Acadians in Father Le Loutre's War. The British settled 3,229 people in Halifax during the first years. This exceeded the number of Mi'kmaq in the entire region and was seen as a threat to the traditional occupiers of the land. The Mi'kmaq and some Acadians resisted the arrival of these Protestant settlers.The war caused unprecedented upheaval in the area. Atlantic Canada witnessed more population movements, more fortification construction, and more troop allocations than ever before. Twenty-four conflicts were recorded during the war (battles, raids, skirmishes), 13 of which were Mi'kmaq and Acadian raids on the capital region Halifax/ Dartmouth. As typical of frontier warfare, many additional conflicts were unrecorded.During Father Le Loutre's War, the British attempted to establish firm control of the major Acadian settlements in peninsular Nova Scotia and to extend their control to the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. The British also wanted to establish Protestant communities in Nova Scotia. During the war, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq left Nova Scotia for the French colonies of Ile St. Jean (Prince Edward Island) and Ile Royale (Cape Breton Island). The French also tried to maintain control of the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. (Father Le Loutre tried to prevent the New Englanders from moving into present-day New Brunswick just as a generation earlier, during Father Rale's War, Rale tried to prevent New Englanders from taking over present-day Maine.) Throughout the war, the Mi’kmaq and Acadians attacked the British forts in Nova Scotia and the newly established Protestant settlements. They wanted to retard British settlement and buy time for France to implement its Acadian resettlement scheme.The war began with the British unilaterally establishing Halifax, which was a violation of an earlier treaty with the Mi'kmaq (1726), signed after Father Rale's War. In response, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq orchestrated attacks at Chignecto, Grand Pré, Dartmouth, Canso, Halifax and Country Harbour. The French erected forts at present-day Saint John, Chignecto and Port Elgin, New Brunswick. The British responded by attacking the Mi'kmaq and Acadians at Mirligueche (later known as Lunenburg), Chignecto and St. Croix. The British unilaterally established communities in Lunenburg and Lawrencetown. Finally, the British erected forts in Acadian communities located at Windsor, Grand Pre and Chignecto. The war ended after six years with the defeat of the Mi'kmaq, Acadians and French in the Battle of Fort Beausejour. (en)
  • Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the British and New England colonists were led by British Officer Charles Lawrence and New England Ranger John Gorham. On the other side, Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadia militia in guerrilla warfare against settlers and British forces. (At the outbreak of the war there were an estimated 2500 Mi'kmaq and 12,000 Acadians in the region.)While the British captured Port Royal in 1710, the Mi'kmaq and Acadians continued to contain the British in settlements at Port Royal and Canso. The rest of the colony was in the control of the Catholic Mi'kmaq and Acadians. About forty years later, the British made a concerted effort to settle Protestants in the region and to establish military control over all of Nova Scotia and present-day New Brunswick, igniting armed response from Acadians in Father Le Loutre's War. The British settled 3,229 people in Halifax during the first years. This exceeded the number of Mi'kmaq in the entire region and was seen as a threat to the traditional occupiers of the land. The Mi'kmaq and some Acadians resisted the arrival of these Protestant settlers.The war caused unprecedented upheaval in the area. Atlantic Canada witnessed more population movements, more fortification construction, and more troop allocations than ever before. Twenty-four conflicts were recorded during the war (battles, raids, skirmishes), 13 of which were Mi'kmaq and Acadian raids on the capital region Halifax/ Dartmouth. As typical of frontier warfare, many additional conflicts were unrecorded.During Father Le Loutre's War, the British attempted to establish firm control of the major Acadian settlements in peninsular Nova Scotia and to extend their control to the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. The British also wanted to establish Protestant communities in Nova Scotia. During the war, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq left Nova Scotia for the French colonies of Ile St. Jean (Prince Edward Island) and Ile Royale (Cape Breton Island). The French also tried to maintain control of the disputed territory of present-day New Brunswick. (Father Le Loutre tried to prevent the New Englanders from moving into present-day New Brunswick just as a generation earlier, during Father Rale's War, Rale tried to prevent New Englanders from taking over present-day Maine.) Throughout the war, the Mi’kmaq and Acadians attacked the British forts in Nova Scotia and the newly established Protestant settlements. They wanted to retard British settlement and buy time for France to implement its Acadian resettlement scheme.The war began with the British unilaterally establishing Halifax, which the Mi'kmaq believed was a violation of an earlier treaty (1726), signed after Father Rale's War. In response, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq orchestrated attacks at Chignecto, Grand Pré, Dartmouth, Canso, Halifax and Country Harbour. The French erected forts at present-day Fort Menagoueche, Fort Beauséjour and Fort Gaspareaux. The British responded by attacking the Mi'kmaq and Acadians at Mirligueche (later known as Lunenburg), Chignecto and St. Croix. The British unilaterally established communities in Lunenburg and Lawrencetown. Finally, the British erected forts in Acadian communities located at Windsor, Grand Pre and Chignecto. The war ended after six years with the defeat of the Mi'kmaq, Acadians and French in the Battle of Fort Beausejour. (en)
dbo:combatant
  • *
  • *British America
  • *Mi'kmaq militia
  • Wabanaki Confederacy
  • *Acadian militia
  • *Maliseet militia
dbo:commander
dbo:place
dbo:result
  • British victory
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2017-09-29 22:07:09Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-30 03:48:35Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-03-24 20:37:30Z (xsd:date)
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  • 30098686 (xsd:integer)
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  • 75792 (xsd:integer)
  • 78600 (xsd:integer)
  • 82665 (xsd:integer)
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  • 2017-09-28 19:05:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-06 19:49:32Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-03-24 20:27:32Z (xsd:date)
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  • 305 (xsd:integer)
  • 317 (xsd:integer)
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  • 802830633 (xsd:integer)
  • 835136420 (xsd:integer)
  • 889299458 (xsd:integer)
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dbp:bot
  • InternetArchiveBot (en)
dbp:caption
  • Soldier of the 29th Regiment of Foot guarding Halifax against raids by Acadian and Mi'kmaq militia by Charles William Jefferys (en)
  • Soldier of the 29th Regiment of Foot guarding Halifax against raids by Acadian and Mi'kmaq militia ; Horseman's Fort in the background; by Charles William Jefferys (en)
  • Soldier of the 29th Regiment of Foot guarding Halifax against raids by Acadian and Mi'kmaq militia ; Horsemans Fort in the background; painting by Charles William Jefferys (en)
  • Map of Acadia, c. 1743. The conflict was primarily fought in Acadia. (en)
dbp:combatant
  • * British America (en)
  • * * Acadian militia Wabanaki Confederacy * Mi'kmaq militia * Maliseet militia (en)
  • * Wabanaki Confederacy * Mi'kmaq militia * Maliseet militia (en)
dbp:commander
  • dbr:Horatio_Gates
  • dbr:Edward_Cornwallis
  • dbr:Joseph_Broussard
  • dbr:Peregrine_Hopson
  • dbr:John_Salusbury_(diarist)
  • dbr:Joshua_Winslow
  • dbr:Ezekiel_Gilman
  • dbr:Thomas_Pichon
  • dbr:George_St._Loe_(military_officer)
  • John Hamilton (en)
  • Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre (en)
  • Father Pierre Maillard (en)
  • John Gorham (en)
  • Charles Lawrence (en)
  • Chief Jean-Baptiste Cope (en)
  • Chief Étienne Bâtard (en)
  • Father Jacques Manach (en)
  • Charles Deschamps de Boishébert (en)
  • William Clapham (en)
  • Edward How (en)
  • John Rous (en)
  • Chief Paul Laurent (en)
  • Father Charles Germain (en)
  • Father Henri Daudin (en)
  • Father Jacques Girard (en)
  • Francis Bartelo (en)
  • Joseph-Nicolas Gautier (en)
  • Louis de La Corne (en)
  • Silvanus Cobb (en)
  • Thomas Moncrieff (en)
  • * Edward Cornwallis * Charles Lawrence * John Gorham * John Rous * Peregrine Hopson * Silvanus Cobb * Horatio Gates * Thomas Pichon * Ezekiel Gilman * William Clapham * George St. Loe * John Salusbury * Ephraim Cook (mariner) * Thomas Moncrieff * Joshua Winslow * John Hamilton * Francis Bartelo * Edward How (en)
  • * Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre * Father Pierre Maillard * Father Charles Germain * Father Henri Daudin * Father Jacques Girard * Father Jacques Manach * Joseph Broussard * Chief Jean-Baptiste Cope * Chief Paul Laurent * Louis de La Corne * Charles Deschamps de Boishébert * Joseph-Nicolas Gautier * Chief Étienne Bâtard (en)
dbp:conflict
  • Father Le Loutre's War (en)
dbp:date
  • 1749 (xsd:integer)
  • September 2017 (en)
dbp:fixAttempted
  • yes (en)
dbp:imageSize
  • 300 (xsd:integer)
dbp:place
  • Acadia and Nova Scotia (en)
dbp:result
  • British victory (en)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Father Le Loutre’s War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the British and New England colonists were led by British Officer Charles Lawrence and New England Ranger John Gorham. On the other side, Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadia militia in guerrilla warfare against settlers and British forces. (en)
  • Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia. On one side of the conflict, the British and New England colonists were led by British Officer Charles Lawrence and New England Ranger John Gorham. On the other side, Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre led the Mi'kmaq and the Acadia militia in guerrilla warfare against settlers and British forces. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Father Le Loutre's War (en)
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  • Father Le Loutre's War (en)
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