The Fatimid Caliphate was an Ismaili Shia caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea in the east to the Atlantic Ocean in the west. The dynasty of Arab origin ruled across the Mediterranean coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt the center of the caliphate. At its height the caliphate included in addition to Egypt varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and Hijaz.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The Fatimid Caliphate was an Ismaili Shia caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea in the east to the Atlantic Ocean in the west. The dynasty of Arab origin ruled across the Mediterranean coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt the center of the caliphate. At its height the caliphate included in addition to Egypt varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and Hijaz. The Fatimids (Arabic: الفاطميون‎, romanized: al-Fāṭimīyūn) claimed descent from Fatimah, the daughter of the prophet Muhammad. The Fatimid state took shape among the Kutama, Berbers located in the west of the North African littoral (now Algeria), in 909 conquering Raqqada, the Aghlabid capital. In 921, the Fatimids established the Tunisian city of Mahdia as their new capital. In 948 they shifted their capital to al-Mansuriyya, near Kairouan in Tunisia. In 969 they conquered Egypt and established Cairo as the capital of their caliphate; Egypt became the political, cultural, and religious centre of their empire that developed a new, indigenous Arabic culture. The ruling class belonged to the Ismai'li branch of Shi'a Islam, as did the leaders of the dynasty. The existence of the caliphate marked the only time the descendants of Ali and Fatimah were united to any degree (except for the final period of the Rashidun Caliphate under Ali himself from 656 to 661) and the name "Fatimid" refers to Fatimah. The different term Fatimi or “Fatimite” by orientalist authors are sometimes used to refer to the caliphate's subjects. After the initial conquests, the caliphate often allowed a degree of religious tolerance towards non-Shia sects of Islam, as well as to Jews, Maltese Christians, and Copts. However, its leaders made little headway in persuading the Egyptian population to adopt its religious beliefs. During the late eleventh and twelfth centuries the Fatimid caliphate declined rapidly, and in 1171 Saladin invaded its territory. He founded the Ayyubid dynasty and incorporated the Fatimid state into the Abbasid Caliphate. (en)
dbo:capital
dbo:currency
dbo:governmentType
dbo:religion
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-11-15 16:46:33Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 56176 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 36983 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-11-15 16:46:28Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 249 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 926327264 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Fatimid Caliphate was an Ismaili Shia caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea in the east to the Atlantic Ocean in the west. The dynasty of Arab origin ruled across the Mediterranean coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt the center of the caliphate. At its height the caliphate included in addition to Egypt varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and Hijaz. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Fatimid Caliphate (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Fatimid Caliphate (en)
is dbo:birthPlace of
is dbo:builder of
is dbo:country of
is dbo:deathPlace of
is dbo:influencedBy of
is dbo:isPartOfMilitaryConflict of
is dbo:nationality of
is dbo:place of
is dbo:stateOfOrigin of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:combatant of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is foaf:primaryTopic of