Pegasus was an early British vacuum tube (valve) computer built by Ferranti, Ltd that pioneered design features to make life easier for both engineers and programmers. Originally it was named the Ferranti Package Computer as its hardware design followed that of the Elliott 401 with modular plug-in packages. Much of the development was the product of three men: W.S. (Bill) Elliott (Hardware); Christopher Strachey (Software) and Bernard Swann (Marketing and Customer Support). It was Ferranti's most popular valve computer with 38 being sold. The first Pegasus was delivered in 1956 and the last was delivered in 1959. Ferranti received funding for the development from the National Research Development Corporation (NRDC).

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  • Pegasus was an early British vacuum tube (valve) computer built by Ferranti, Ltd that pioneered design features to make life easier for both engineers and programmers. Originally it was named the Ferranti Package Computer as its hardware design followed that of the Elliott 401 with modular plug-in packages. Much of the development was the product of three men: W.S. (Bill) Elliott (Hardware); Christopher Strachey (Software) and Bernard Swann (Marketing and Customer Support). It was Ferranti's most popular valve computer with 38 being sold. The first Pegasus was delivered in 1956 and the last was delivered in 1959. Ferranti received funding for the development from the National Research Development Corporation (NRDC). At least two Pegasus machines survive, one in The Science Museum, London and one in The Manchester Museum of Science and Industry. The Pegasus in The Science Museum ran its first program in December 1959 and was regularly demonstrated until 2009 when it developed a severe electrical fault. In early 2014, the Science Museum decided to retire it permanently, effectively ending the life of one of the world's oldest working computers. The Pegasus officially held the title of the world's oldest computer until 2012, when the restoration of the Harwell computer was completed at the National Museum of Computing. (en)
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  • Pegasus was an early British vacuum tube (valve) computer built by Ferranti, Ltd that pioneered design features to make life easier for both engineers and programmers. Originally it was named the Ferranti Package Computer as its hardware design followed that of the Elliott 401 with modular plug-in packages. Much of the development was the product of three men: W.S. (Bill) Elliott (Hardware); Christopher Strachey (Software) and Bernard Swann (Marketing and Customer Support). It was Ferranti's most popular valve computer with 38 being sold. The first Pegasus was delivered in 1956 and the last was delivered in 1959. Ferranti received funding for the development from the National Research Development Corporation (NRDC). (en)
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  • Ferranti Pegasus (en)
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