The genetic history of Europe since the Upper Paleolithic is inseparable from that of wider Western Eurasia.By about 50,000 years ago (50 ka) a basal West Eurasian lineage had emerged (alongside a separate East Asian lineage) out of the undifferentiated "non-African" lineage of 70 ka.Both basal East and West Eurasians were early exposed to significant Neanderthal admixture. Ethnogenesis of the modern ethnic groups of Europe in the historical period is associated with numerous admixture events, primarily those associated with the Roman, Germanic, Norse, Slavic, Arab and Turkish expansions.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The genetic history of Europe since the Upper Paleolithic is inseparable from that of wider Western Eurasia.By about 50,000 years ago (50 ka) a basal West Eurasian lineage had emerged (alongside a separate East Asian lineage) out of the undifferentiated "non-African" lineage of 70 ka.Both basal East and West Eurasians were early exposed to significant Neanderthal admixture. European early modern humans (EEMH) lineages between 40 and 26 ka (Aurignacian) were still part of a large Western Eurasian "meta-population", related to Central and Western Asian populations.Divergence into genetically distinct sub-populations within Western Eurasia is a result of increased selection pressure and founder effects during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, Gravettian).By the end of the LGM, after 20 ka, A Western European lineage, dubbedWest European Hunter-Gatherer (WHG) emerges from the Solutrean refugium during the European Mesolithic. All of the successfully tested Mesolithic, West European Hunter-gather, Y-chromosomes, one from Luxembourg and four from Motala, Sweden, belonged to haplogroup I. Haplogroup I is the main candidate for Europe's indigenous Y-haplogroup, which is today the most common Y-haplogroup in most of Scandinavia. These mesolithic hunter-gatherer cultures are substantially replaced in the Neolithic Revolution by the arrival of Early European Farmers (EEF) lineages derived from mesolithic populations of West Asia (Anatolia and the Caucasus).In the European Bronze Age, there were again substantial population replacements in parts of Europe by the intrusion of Ancient North Eurasian (ANE) lineages from the Pontic–Caspian steppes. These Bronze Age population replacements are associated with the Beaker culture archaeologically and with the Indo-European expansion linguistically. As a result of the population movements during the Mesolithic to Bronze Age, modern European populations are distinguished by differences in WHG, EEF and ANE ancestry.Admixture rates varied geographically; in the late Neolithic, WHG ancestry in farmers in Hungary was at around 10%, in Germany around 25% and in Iberia as high as 50%. The contribution of EEF is more significant in Mediterranean Europe, and declines towards northern and northeastern Europe, where WHG ancestry is stronger; the Sardinians are characterized by almost pure derivation from EEF. ANE ancestry is found through throughout Europe, with maxima of about 20% found in Baltic people and Finns. Ethnogenesis of the modern ethnic groups of Europe in the historical period is associated with numerous admixture events, primarily those associated with the Roman, Germanic, Norse, Slavic, Arab and Turkish expansions. Research into the genetic history of Europe became possible in the second half of the 20th century, but did not yield results with high resolution before the 1990s. In the 1990s, preliminary results became possible, but they remained mostly limited to studies of mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal lineages. Autosomal DNA became more easily accessible in the 2000s, and!since the mid-2010s, results of previously unattainable resolution, many of them based on full-genome analysis of ancient DNA, have been published at an accelerated pace. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-11-19 11:08:12Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 6578583 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 143117 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-11-19 11:08:07Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 441 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 926941110 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • The genetic history of Europe since the Upper Paleolithic is inseparable from that of wider Western Eurasia.By about 50,000 years ago (50 ka) a basal West Eurasian lineage had emerged (alongside a separate East Asian lineage) out of the undifferentiated "non-African" lineage of 70 ka.Both basal East and West Eurasians were early exposed to significant Neanderthal admixture. Ethnogenesis of the modern ethnic groups of Europe in the historical period is associated with numerous admixture events, primarily those associated with the Roman, Germanic, Norse, Slavic, Arab and Turkish expansions. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Genetic history of Europe (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is foaf:primaryTopic of