Goryeo, also known as Koryŏ (Hangul: 고려; hanja: 高麗; Korean pronunciation: [koɾjʌ]; 918–1392), was a Korean dynasty established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Goryeo, also known as Koryŏ (Hangul: 고려; hanja: 高麗; Korean pronunciation: [koɾjʌ]; 918–1392), was a Korean dynasty established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. Goryeo expanded Korea's borders to present-day Wonsan in the northeast (936–943), the Yalu River (993) and finally almost the whole of the Korean Peninsula (1374).Two of this period's most notable products are celadon pottery and the Tripitaka Koreana—the Buddhist canon (Tripiṭaka) carved onto more than 80,000 woodblocks and stored (and still remaining) at Haeinsa. The people of Goryeo also created the first metal movable type that was capable of printing actual books, in 1234; the oldest surviving metal movable type book, the Jikji, was printed in 1377.In 668, Silla conquered Baekje and Goguryeo with an alliance with Tang China, but by the late 9th century it was tottering, its monarchs being unimaginative and pressed by the power of powerful statesmen. Many robbers and outlaws agitated and in 900 Gyeon Hwon revolted from Silla control in the Jeolla region as the state of Later Baekje; the year after, Gung Ye revolted from the northern regions as Taebong. A son of a regional lord, Wang Geon, joined Taebong as a general.Taebong fell when Wang Geon revolted and killed Gung Ye in 918; he was crowned Taejo of Goryeo in June of the same year. Silla was overpowered by Goryeo and Later Baekje and surrendered to Goryeo in 935. In 936, Later Baekje surrendered and Goryeo subsequently maintained an unbroken dynasty that ruled Korea for 474 years, although the government was controlled by military regime leaders between 1170 and 1270.By the late 13th century, Goryeo had lost much of its power due to the Mongols and their Yuan dynasty. Although King Gongmin managed to free his kingdom from the Yuan overlordship in the mid-14th century, General Yi Seonggye revolted and overthrew King Gongyang in 1392, establishing himself as Taejo of Joseon. Gongyang was killed in 1394. (en)
  • Goryeo, also spelled as Koryŏ (Hangul: 고려; hanja: 高麗; Korean pronunciation: [koɾjʌ]; 918–1392), was a Korean dynasty established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. Goryeo expanded Korea's borders to present-day Wonsan in the northeast (936–943), the Yalu River (993) and finally almost the whole of the Korean Peninsula (1374).Two of this period's most notable products are celadon pottery and the Tripitaka Koreana—the Buddhist canon (Tripiṭaka) carved onto more than 80,000 woodblocks and stored (and still remaining) at Haeinsa. The people of Goryeo also created the first metal movable type that was capable of printing actual books, in 1234; the oldest surviving metal movable type book, the Jikji, was printed in 1377.In 668, Silla conquered Baekje and Goguryeo with an alliance with Tang China, but by the late 9th century it was tottering, its monarchs being unimaginative and pressed by the power of powerful statesmen. Many robbers and outlaws agitated and in 900 Gyeon Hwon revolted from Silla control in the Jeolla region as the state of Later Baekje; the year after, Gung Ye revolted from the northern regions as Taebong. A son of a regional lord, Wang Geon, joined Taebong as a general.Taebong fell when Wang Geon revolted and killed Gung Ye in 918; he was crowned Taejo of Goryeo in June of the same year. Silla was overpowered by Goryeo and Later Baekje and surrendered to Goryeo in 935. In 936, Later Baekje surrendered and Goryeo subsequently maintained an unbroken dynasty that ruled Korea for 474 years, although the government was controlled by military regime leaders between 1170 and 1270.By the late 13th century, Goryeo had lost much of its power due to the Mongols and their Yuan dynasty. Although King Gongmin managed to free his kingdom from the Yuan overlordship in the mid-14th century, General Yi Seonggye revolted and overthrew King Gongyang in 1392, establishing himself as Taejo of Joseon. Gongyang was killed in 1394. (en)
  • Goryeo, also spelled as Koryŏ (Hangul: 고려; Hanja: 高麗; Korean pronunciation: [koɾjʌ]; 918–1392), was a Korean dynasty established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. Goryeo expanded Korea's borders to present-day Wonsan in the northeast (936–943), the Yalu River (993) and finally almost the whole of the Korean Peninsula (1374).Two of this period's most notable products are celadon pottery and the Tripitaka Koreana—the Buddhist canon (Tripiṭaka) carved onto more than 80,000 woodblocks and stored (and still remaining) at Haeinsa. The people of Goryeo also created the first metal movable type that was capable of printing actual books, in 1234; the oldest surviving metal movable type book, the Jikji, was printed in 1377.In 668, Silla conquered Baekje and Goguryeo with an alliance with Tang China, but by the late 9th century it was tottering, its monarchs being unimaginative and pressed by the power of powerful statesmen. Many robbers and outlaws agitated and in 900 Gyeon Hwon revolted from Silla control in the Jeolla region as the state of Later Baekje; the year after, Gung Ye revolted from the northern regions as Taebong. A son of a regional lord, Wang Geon, joined Taebong as a general.Taebong fell when Wang Geon revolted and killed Gung Ye in 918; he was crowned Taejo of Goryeo in June of the same year. Silla was overpowered by Goryeo and Later Baekje and surrendered to Goryeo in 935. In 936, Later Baekje surrendered and Goryeo subsequently maintained an unbroken dynasty that ruled Korea for 474 years, although the government was controlled by military regime leaders between 1170 and 1270.By the late 13th century, Goryeo had lost much of its power due to the Mongols and their Yuan dynasty. Although King Gongmin managed to free his kingdom from the Yuan overlordship in the mid-14th century, General Yi Seonggye revolted and overthrew King Gongyang in 1392, establishing himself as Taejo of Joseon. Gongyang was killed in 1394. (en)
  • Goryeo (고려; 高麗; [ko.ɾjʌ]; 918–1392), also spelled as Koryŏ, was a Korean kingdom established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. Goryeo expanded Korea's borders to present-day Wonsan in the northeast (936–943), the Yalu River (993) and finally almost the whole of the Korean Peninsula (1374).Two of this period's most notable products are celadon pottery and the Tripitaka Koreana—the Buddhist canon (Tripiṭaka) carved onto more than 80,000 woodblocks and stored (and still remaining) at Haeinsa. The oldest surviving metal movable type book, the Jikji, was printed in 1377.In 668, Silla conquered Baekje and Goguryeo with an alliance with Tang China, but by the late 9th century it was tottering, its monarchs being unimaginative and pressed by the power of powerful statesmen. Many robbers and outlaws agitated and in 900 Gyeon Hwon revolted from Silla control in the Jeolla region as the state of Later Baekje; the year after, Gung Ye revolted from the northern regions as Taebong (Later Goguryeo). A son of a regional lord, Wang Geon, joined Taebong as a general.Taebong fell when Wang Geon revolted and killed Gung Ye in 918; he was crowned Taejo of Goryeo in July of the same year. Silla was overpowered by Goryeo and Later Baekje and surrendered to Goryeo in 935. In 936, Later Baekje surrendered and Goryeo subsequently maintained an unbroken dynasty that ruled Korea for 474 years, although the government was controlled by military regime leaders between 1170 and 1270.By the late 13th century, after nearly 30 years of warfare with the Mongols of the Yuan dynasty, Goryeo lost much of its power but retained nominal control. Although King Gongmin managed to free his kingdom from the Yuan overlordship in the mid-14th century, General Yi Seonggye revolted and overthrew King Gongyang in 1392, establishing himself as Taejo of Joseon. Gongyang was killed in 1394. (en)
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  • ( (en)
  • ) (en)
dbo:religion
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dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2017-09-30 14:02:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-30 19:41:03Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-04-22 04:18:04Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
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  • 2017-09-23 08:01:01Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-18 04:38:08Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-04-22 04:07:56Z (xsd:date)
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dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:author
  • Hans Bielenstein (en)
dbp:capital
  • Seoul (en)
  • Ganghwa (en)
  • Kaesong (en)
  • Main capital: (en)
  • Temporary capitals: (en)
dbp:certain
  • yes (en)
dbp:commonLanguages
dbp:commonName
  • Goryeo (en)
dbp:context
  • old (en)
dbp:continent
  • Asia (en)
dbp:conventionalLongName
  • Kingdom of Goryeo (en)
dbp:country
  • Korea (en)
dbp:date
  • December 2017 (en)
dbp:dateEnd
  • --07-31
  • --07-12
dbp:dateEvent
  • 936 (xsd:integer)
  • 993 (xsd:integer)
  • 1170 (xsd:integer)
  • 1251 (xsd:integer)
  • 1270 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(1270,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1170,None,None)
  • ParseResult(936,None,None)
  • ParseResult(993,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1251,None,None)
dbp:datePre
  • 900 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(900,None,None)
dbp:dateStart
  • --07-25
dbp:deputy
dbp:event
dbp:eventEnd
  • Abdication of Gongyang (en)
dbp:eventStart
  • Coronation of Taejo (en)
dbp:flagBorder
  • no (en)
dbp:flagP
  • Seal of Silla.png (en)
dbp:flagS
  • Flag of the King of Joseon .svg (en)
dbp:flagType
  • Royal flag (en)
dbp:governmentType
  • Monarchy (en)
dbp:hangul
  • 고려 (en)
dbp:hanja
  • 高麗 (en)
dbp:imageCoat
  • Seal of Goryeo.svg (en)
  • Seal of Goryeo King.svg (en)
dbp:imageFlag
  • Royal flag of Goryeo .svg (en)
dbp:imageMap
  • koryo map.png (en)
dbp:imageMapCaption
  • Goryeo in 1374 (en)
dbp:labels
  • no (en)
dbp:latd
  • 37 (xsd:integer)
dbp:latm
  • 58 (xsd:integer)
dbp:latns
  • N (en)
dbp:leader
dbp:longd
  • 126 (xsd:integer)
dbp:longew
  • E (en)
dbp:longm
  • 33 (xsd:integer)
dbp:mr
  • Koryŏ (en)
dbp:p
  • Balhae (en)
  • Later Silla (en)
  • Later Baekje (en)
  • Later Goguryeo (en)
dbp:region
  • Korean Peninsula (en)
dbp:religion
dbp:rr
  • Goryeo (en)
dbp:s
  • Joseon (en)
dbp:source
  • Diplomacy and Trade in the Chinese World, 589-1276 (en)
dbp:statPop
  • 3000000 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(5000000,None,None)
  • ParseResult(3000000,None,None)
  • ParseResult(2100000,None,None)
dbp:statYear
  • N/A (en)
  • ParseResult(1123,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1200,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1392,None,None)
dbp:status
  • Vassal state of the Mongol Yuan dynasty (en)
  • Vassal state of the Yuan dynasty (en)
dbp:symbolType
  • Royal seal (en)
dbp:text
  • To repeat, Koryŏ was not a vassal with tributary duties to the Five Dynasties, Sung, Liao, and Chin. In spite of its smaller size, it was able to stand up to Liao and Chin, and did not have to buy peace. This required clever diplomacy and a minimum of appeasement. In spite of window-dressing, rhetorics, and even a pinch of nostalgia for the good old times of Korean-Chinese friendship, Koryŏ succeeded in keeping its autonomy until the advent of the Mongols. (en)
  • The Five Dynasties, Sung, Liao, and Chin all liked to pretend that Koryŏ was a tributary vassal. Nothing could be more wrong. The Five Dynasties and Sung had no common border with Koryŏ and no way, even if they had possessed the military resources, to assert any supremacy over it. The Liao invasions of Koryŏ from 993 to 1020 were successfully repelled by the Koreans. The Chin made no serious attempts against Koryŏ. The dynastic historians accepted nevertheless the official fiction and referred to Koryŏ by an unrealistic terminology. (en)
dbp:title
  • Korean name (en)
dbp:titleDeputy
dbp:titleLeader
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:yearDeputy
  • 1170 (xsd:integer)
  • 1174 (xsd:integer)
  • 1196 (xsd:integer)
  • 1270 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(1270,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1196,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1170,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1174,None,None)
dbp:yearEnd
  • 1392 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(1392,None,None)
dbp:yearLeader
  • 918 (xsd:integer)
  • 949 (xsd:integer)
  • 981 (xsd:integer)
  • 1046 (xsd:integer)
  • 1351 (xsd:integer)
  • 1389 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(918,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1389,None,None)
  • ParseResult(981,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1046,None,None)
  • ParseResult(1351,None,None)
  • ParseResult(949,None,None)
dbp:yearStart
  • 918 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(918,None,None)
dct:subject
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  • 37.96666666666667 126.55
  • 37.96666666666667 126.55
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Goryeo, also known as Koryŏ (Hangul: 고려; hanja: 高麗; Korean pronunciation: [koɾjʌ]; 918–1392), was a Korean dynasty established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. (en)
  • Goryeo, also spelled as Koryŏ (Hangul: 고려; hanja: 高麗; Korean pronunciation: [koɾjʌ]; 918–1392), was a Korean dynasty established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. (en)
  • Goryeo (고려; 高麗; [ko.ɾjʌ]; 918–1392), also spelled as Koryŏ, was a Korean kingdom established in 918 by King Taejo. This kingdom later gave name to the modern exonym "Korea". It united the Later Three Kingdoms in 936 and ruled most of the Korean Peninsula until it was removed by the founder of the Joseon in 1392. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Goryeo (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
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  • POINT(126.55000305176 37.966667175293)
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  • 37.966667 (xsd:float)
  • 37.966667 (xsd:float)
geo:long
  • 126.550003 (xsd:float)
  • 126.550003 (xsd:float)
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foaf:name
  • Goryeo (en)
  • Kingdom of Goryeo (en)
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