Heckfield Place is an 18th-century Georgian country estate in Heckfield, Hampshire, England. The original manor house, now a Grade II listed building was the home of Lord Eversley, Charles Shaw-Lefevre, the second longest serving speaker of the House of Commons. Upon Lord Eversley's death in 1888, the estate was passed to his daughter Emma Laura Shaw Lefevre and then in 1895 it was sold to Lieutenant Colonel Horace Walpole and his family.

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  • Heckfield Place is an 18th-century Georgian country estate in Heckfield, Hampshire, England. The original manor house, now a Grade II listed building was the home of Lord Eversley, Charles Shaw-Lefevre, the second longest serving speaker of the House of Commons. Upon Lord Eversley's death in 1888, the estate was passed to his daughter Emma Laura Shaw Lefevre and then in 1895 it was sold to Lieutenant Colonel Horace Walpole and his family. In the 1980s, Heckfield Place was purchased by Racal Electronics plc., who greatly expanded it as a commercial conference and training centre. From 2000 to 2002, it was run as a corporate training center by the Thales Group. The building has been undergoing major refurbishment since 2009 and now provides hotel accommodation and restaurant facilities. It also has a spa. (en)
  • A country estate of 438 acres, the heart of Heckfield Place is a Georgian Grade II listed manor house. Built between 1763 and 1766 for Jane Hawley (1744-1815), it was enlarged by the Shaw Lefevre family who lived in the estate from 1786-1895. In the 20th century, it was owned by the family of Col Horace Walpole before being sold to Racal Electronics plc. and converted to a conference and training centre in 1981-1982. An additional wing was added to the north of the manor house, extending into the walled garden. From 2000 to 2002, Heckfield Place was run as a corporate training centre by the Thales Group. The building underwent major refurbishment from 2009 until 2018, when it opened as a luxury country house hotel and awarded The Sunday Times’ Hotel of the Year Award in 2018. (en)
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  • Heckfield Place is an 18th-century Georgian country estate in Heckfield, Hampshire, England. The original manor house, now a Grade II listed building was the home of Lord Eversley, Charles Shaw-Lefevre, the second longest serving speaker of the House of Commons. Upon Lord Eversley's death in 1888, the estate was passed to his daughter Emma Laura Shaw Lefevre and then in 1895 it was sold to Lieutenant Colonel Horace Walpole and his family. (en)
  • A country estate of 438 acres, the heart of Heckfield Place is a Georgian Grade II listed manor house. Built between 1763 and 1766 for Jane Hawley (1744-1815), it was enlarged by the Shaw Lefevre family who lived in the estate from 1786-1895. In the 20th century, it was owned by the family of Col Horace Walpole before being sold to Racal Electronics plc. and converted to a conference and training centre in 1981-1982. (en)
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  • Heckfield Place (en)
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