Iki (いき, English: roughly "chic, stylish") is a concept in aesthetics, the basis of which is thought to have formed among urbane commoners (chōnin) in Edo in the Tokugawa period. Iki is sometimes misunderstood as simply "anything Japanese" overseas, but it is actually a specific aesthetic ideal, distinct from more ethereal notions of transcendence or poverty. As such, samurai, for example, would typically, as a class, be considered devoid of iki (see yabo). At the same time, individual warriors are often depicted in contemporary popular imagination as embodying the iki ideals of a clear, stylish manner and blunt, unwavering directness. The term became widespread in modern intellectual circles through the book (1930) by Kuki Shūzō.

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  • Iki (いき, English: roughly "chic, stylish") is a concept in aesthetics, the basis of which is thought to have formed among urbane commoners (chōnin) in Edo in the Tokugawa period. Iki is sometimes misunderstood as simply "anything Japanese" overseas, but it is actually a specific aesthetic ideal, distinct from more ethereal notions of transcendence or poverty. As such, samurai, for example, would typically, as a class, be considered devoid of iki (see yabo). At the same time, individual warriors are often depicted in contemporary popular imagination as embodying the iki ideals of a clear, stylish manner and blunt, unwavering directness. The term became widespread in modern intellectual circles through the book (1930) by Kuki Shūzō. (en)
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  • Iki (いき, English: roughly "chic, stylish") is a concept in aesthetics, the basis of which is thought to have formed among urbane commoners (chōnin) in Edo in the Tokugawa period. Iki is sometimes misunderstood as simply "anything Japanese" overseas, but it is actually a specific aesthetic ideal, distinct from more ethereal notions of transcendence or poverty. As such, samurai, for example, would typically, as a class, be considered devoid of iki (see yabo). At the same time, individual warriors are often depicted in contemporary popular imagination as embodying the iki ideals of a clear, stylish manner and blunt, unwavering directness. The term became widespread in modern intellectual circles through the book (1930) by Kuki Shūzō. (en)
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  • Iki (aesthetics) (en)
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