Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G.

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  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern, North Carolina is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German, and is named after Bern, Switzerland. It sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones used to provide weight and thus stability to unladen ships, can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. New Bern is the home of Tryon Palace, “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,5751811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis1816 House occupied and listed in tax records1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.1858 Purchase by Alonzo T. Jerkins1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverList of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles and referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found here.The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940Several Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis House:New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern, North Carolina is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German, and is named after Bern, Switzerland. It sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones used to provide weight and thus stability to unladen ships, can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. New Bern is the home of Tryon Palace, “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,5751811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis1816 House occupied and listed in tax records1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.1858 Purchase by Alonzo T. Jerkins1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex . The number III is visible here on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles and referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found here.The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940Several Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis House:New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern, North Carolina is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German, and is named after Bern, Switzerland. It sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones used to provide weight and thus stability to unladen ships, can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. New Bern is the home of Tryon Palace, “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,5751811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis1816 House occupied and listed in tax records1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.1858 Purchase by Alonzo T. Jerkins1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible here on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles and referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found here.The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940Several Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis House:New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German. It is named after Bern, Switzerland. It is the home of Tryon Palace which was “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.New Bern sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones which were used to provide weight and stability to unladen ship can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,5751811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis1816 House occupied and listed in tax records1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.1858 Purchased by Alonzo T. Jerkins1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible here on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found [https://ia800302.us.archive.org/27/items/atticguestanove00knowgoog/atticguestanove00knowgoog.pdf The Attic Guest here].The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940, includes a photo of a cover page and the survey showing the address as 99 East Front Street.Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division "1920's General View of Front and Side" photograph of Jones-Jarvis House.U.S. Military Institute "Crow nest signal station, Jones-Jarvis house. Southeast corner of East Front and Johnson streets, ca. 1863." photograph showing the signal station built atop the catwalk between the two chimneys. According to A New Bern Album: Old Photographs of New Bern, North Carolina and the Surrounding Countryside by John B. Green III, Union troops used flares, lanterns and flags to communicate with the fort and troops on the other side of the Neuse River.Jones-Jarvis Facebook page.New Bern history.Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Attic Guest by Robert Knowles, 1909New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German. It is named after Bern, Switzerland. It is the home of Tryon Palace which was “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.New Bern sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones which were used to provide weight and stability to unladen ship can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,5751811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis1816 House occupied and listed in tax records1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.1858 Purchased by Alonzo T. Jerkins1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible in the photo on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found [https://ia800302.us.archive.org/27/items/atticguestanove00knowgoog/atticguestanove00knowgoog.pdf The Attic Guest here].The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940, includes a photo of a cover page and the survey showing the address as 99 East Front Street.Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division "1920's General View of Front and Side" photograph of Jones-Jarvis House.U.S. Military Institute "Crow nest signal station, Jones-Jarvis house. Southeast corner of East Front and Johnson streets, ca. 1863." photograph showing the signal station built atop the catwalk between the two chimneys. According to A New Bern Album: Old Photographs of New Bern, North Carolina and the Surrounding Countryside by John B. Green III, Union troops used flares, lanterns and flags to communicate with the fort and troops on the other side of the Neuse River.Jones-Jarvis Facebook page.New Bern history.Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Attic Guest by Robert Knowles, 1909New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House.The Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German. It is named after Bern, Switzerland. It is the home of Tryon Palace which was “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.New Bern sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones which were used to provide weight and stability to unladen ship can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state[3]."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline[3]· 1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,575· 1811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis· 1816 House occupied and listed in tax records· 1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown· 1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.· 1858 Purchased by Alonzo T. Jerkins· 1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.· 1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible in the photo on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found [https://ia800302.us.archive.org/27/items/atticguestanove00knowgoog/atticguestanove00knowgoog.pdf The Attic Guest here].The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940, includes a photo of a cover page and the survey showing the address as 99 East Front Street.Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division "1920's General View of Front and Side" photograph of Jones-Jarvis House.U.S. Military Institute "Crow nest signal station, Jones-Jarvis house. Southeast corner of East Front and Johnson streets, ca. 1863." photograph showing the signal station built atop the catwalk between the two chimneys. According to A New Bern Album: Old Photographs of New Bern, North Carolina and the Surrounding Countryside by John B. Green III, Union troops used flares, lanterns and flags to communicate with the fort and troops on the other side of the Neuse River.New Bern history.Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis House· The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles, 1909· New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927· The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988· Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011· A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German. It is named after Bern, Switzerland. It is the home of Tryon Palace which was “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.New Bern sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones which were used to provide weight and stability to unladen ship can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard. Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state[3]."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline[3]· 1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,575· 1811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis· 1816 House occupied and listed in tax records· 1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown· 1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.· 1858 Purchased by Alonzo T. Jerkins· 1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.· 1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible in the photo on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found [https://ia800302.us.archive.org/27/items/atticguestanove00knowgoog/atticguestanove00knowgoog.pdf The Attic Guest here].The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940, includes a photo of a cover page and the survey showing the address as 99 East Front Street.Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division "1920's General View of Front and Side" photograph of Jones-Jarvis House.U.S. Military Institute "Crow nest signal station, Jones-Jarvis house. Southeast corner of East Front and Johnson streets, ca. 1863." photograph showing the signal station built atop the catwalk between the two chimneys. According to A New Bern Album: Old Photographs of New Bern, North Carolina and the Surrounding Countryside by John B. Green III, Union troops used flares, lanterns and flags to communicate with the fort and troops on the other side of the Neuse River.New Bern history.Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis House· The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles, 1909· New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927· The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988· Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011· A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German. It is named after Bern, Switzerland. It is the home of Tryon Palace which was “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.New Bern sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones which were used to provide weight and stability to unladen ship can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard.Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state[3]."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline[3]· 1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,575· 1811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis· 1816 House occupied and listed in tax records· 1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown· 1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.· 1858 Purchased by Alonzo T. Jerkins· 1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.· 1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible in the photo on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found [https://ia800302.us.archive.org/27/items/atticguestanove00knowgoog/atticguestanove00knowgoog.pdf The Attic Guest here].The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940, includes a photo of a cover page and the survey showing the address as 99 East Front Street.Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division "1920's General View of Front and Side" photograph of Jones-Jarvis House.U.S. Military Institute "Crow nest signal station, Jones-Jarvis house. Southeast corner of East Front and Johnson streets, ca. 1863." photograph showing the signal station built atop the catwalk between the two chimneys. According to A New Bern Album: Old Photographs of New Bern, North Carolina and the Surrounding Countryside by John B. Green III, Union troops used flares, lanterns and flags to communicate with the fort and troops on the other side of the Neuse River.New Bern history.Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis House· The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles, 1909· New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927· The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988· Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011· A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.Historic New BernNew Bern is the second oldest city in North Carolina settled in 1710 by the Swiss and the German and named after Bern, Switzerland. It is the home of Tryon Palace which was “the seat of the province’s Colonial government” through North Carolina’s statehood in 1789. The city was captured and occupied by Union troops on March 14, 1862.New Bern sits at the confluence of two beautiful rivers, the Trent and Neuse Rivers, and only 37 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The influence of the rivers and nearby ocean had a significant impact on its history. In the 1800’s, it grew into a major port and trading center. Large ballast stones which were used to provide weight and stability to unladen ship can be found in the basement of the Jones-Jarvis House and in the yard.Jones-Jarvis House and Federal ArchitectureThe Jones-Jarvis House is one of New Bern’s outstanding examples of federal architecture. The lot was purchased by Frederick Jones in 1810 for $1,575 and later sold to Moses Jarvis. It was occupied and listed on tax records in 1816. It is described as:“one of a small number of brick Federal houses in New Bern, all built on a side-hall plan, and all similar. Either because of site, or finish, or the occupations of their owners, however, each possesses a distinct architectural and historical character. This house, with its lots fronting on the Neuse River, is part of a group of nineteenth century brick houses at the corner of Union and East Front streets which is one of the finest architectural complexes in the state[3]."and,"The elegant scale and delicate detailing that characterize the exterior of the dwelling are repeated on the interior."The Eli Smallwood House next door and the Jones-Jarvis house are nearly identical. Across the street is the Slover-Bradham House. It was General Burnside’s headquarters and later the home of Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist who invented Pepsi-Cola in 1898.Timeline[3]1810 Lot purchased by Frederic Jones for $1,5751811 Purchased by Moses Jarvis1816 House occupied and listed in tax records1817 Transferred to Sylvester Brown1822 Returned to Moses Jarvis, Jr.1858 Purchased by Alonzo T. Jerkins1862 – 1865 Occupied by Union Army as part of headquarters. Became private residence for General John Foster.1868 Purchased by Mary C. SloverDetail of Attic BeamsEach set of beams has Roman numerals carved near the apex .The number III is visible in the photo on the right and left beams.List of ResourcesNational Register of Historic Homes Nomination Form. This is rich in architectural detail, the history of the house and surrounding homes.The Attic Guest by Robert Knowles referenced in the Historic Register is based on a true story of a minister who stayed in the attic. It can be found [https://ia800302.us.archive.org/27/items/atticguestanove00knowgoog/atticguestanove00knowgoog.pdf The Attic Guest here].The Foscue Plantation cites the Jones-Jarvis House and Eli Smallwood House as inspiration to Simon Foscue for the plantation’s design.Historic American Buildings Survey completed by Thomas T. Waterman 1940, includes a photo of a cover page and the survey showing the address as 99 East Front Street.Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division "1920's General View of Front and Side" photograph of Jones-Jarvis House.U.S. Military Institute "Crow nest signal station, Jones-Jarvis house. Southeast corner of East Front and Johnson streets, ca. 1863." photograph showing the signal station built atop the catwalk between the two chimneys. According to A New Bern Album: Old Photographs of New Bern, North Carolina and the Surrounding Countryside by John B. Green III, Union troops used flares, lanterns and flags to communicate with the fort and troops on the other side of the Neuse River.New Bern history.Books Referencing the Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Attic Guest by Robert Knowles, 1909New England Influence on North Carolina Architecture (New Bern - Part Two) by Aymar Embury, 1927The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina by Peter B. Sandbeck, 1988Touring the Carolina's Civil War Sites (Touring the Backroads) by Clint Johnson, 2011A Walking Guide to North Carolina's Historic New Bern by Bill Hand, 2007Related Names Jarvis-Slover House, Jones-Jarvis-Hand House, Jones-Jarvis House, General Foster's Headquarters, Tryon Palace (en)
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  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. Foster moved into this house, and it served first as his residence and later as part of the headquarters of the Eighteenth Army Corps. (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis House.The Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. (en)
  • Jones-Jarvis HouseThe Jones-Jarvis House, also known as General Foster's Headquarters and Jarvis-Slover House, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1810, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay, side-hall plan, Federal style brick dwelling. It has a one-story brick and frame rear wing. During the American Civil War, General John G. (en)
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