The anti-trust class-action lawsuit Jung v. AAMC alleged collusion to prevent American trainee doctors from negotiating for better working conditions. The working conditions of medical residents often involved 80- to 100-hour workweeks. The suit had some early success, but failed when the U.S. Congress enacted a statute exempting matching programs from federal anti-trust laws.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The anti-trust class-action lawsuit Jung v. AAMC alleged collusion to prevent American trainee doctors from negotiating for better working conditions. The working conditions of medical residents often involved 80- to 100-hour workweeks. The suit had some early success, but failed when the U.S. Congress enacted a statute exempting matching programs from federal anti-trust laws. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-10-04 04:02:05Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 50445931 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 7662 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-10-04 04:00:51Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 31 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 919514577 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • The anti-trust class-action lawsuit Jung v. AAMC alleged collusion to prevent American trainee doctors from negotiating for better working conditions. The working conditions of medical residents often involved 80- to 100-hour workweeks. The suit had some early success, but failed when the U.S. Congress enacted a statute exempting matching programs from federal anti-trust laws. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Jung v. Association of American Medical Colleges (en)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
owl:sameAs
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is foaf:primaryTopic of