The Kitos War (115–117; Hebrew: מרד הגלויות‎: mered ha'galuyot or mered ha'tfutzot [מרד התפוצות]; translation: rebellion of the diaspora. Latin: Tumultus Iudaicus) was one of the major Jewish–Roman wars, 66–136. The rebellions erupted in the year 115, when a majority of the Roman armies were fighting Trajan's Parthian War on the eastern border of the Roman Empire. Major uprisings by ethnic Judeans in Cyrenaica, Cyprus and Egypt spiraled out of control, resulting in a widespread slaughter of left-behind Roman garrisons and Roman citizens by Jewish rebels.

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  • The Kitos War (115–117; Hebrew: מרד הגלויות‎: mered ha'galuyot or mered ha'tfutzot [מרד התפוצות]; translation: rebellion of the diaspora. Latin: Tumultus Iudaicus) was one of the major Jewish–Roman wars, 66–136. The rebellions erupted in the year 115, when a majority of the Roman armies were fighting Trajan's Parthian War on the eastern border of the Roman Empire. Major uprisings by ethnic Judeans in Cyrenaica, Cyprus and Egypt spiraled out of control, resulting in a widespread slaughter of left-behind Roman garrisons and Roman citizens by Jewish rebels. The Jewish rebellions were finally crushed by Roman legionary forces, chiefly by the Roman general Lusius Quietus, whose nomen later gave the conflict its title, as "Kitos" is a later corruption of Quietus. Some were left so utterly annihilated that Romans moved in to settle these areas to prevent their complete depopulation. The Jewish leader, Lukuas, fled to Judea. Marcius Turbo pursued him and sentenced to death the brothers Julian and Pappus, who had been key leaders in the rebellion. Lusius Quietus, the conqueror of the Jews of Mesopotamia, was now in command of the Roman army in Judea, and laid siege to Lydda, where the rebel Jews had gathered under the leadership of Julian and Pappus. Lydda was next taken and many of the rebellious Jews were executed; the "slain of Lydda" are often mentioned in words of reverential praise in the Talmud. The rebel leaders Pappus and Julian were among those executed by the Romans in the same year. The situation in Judea remained tense for the Romans, who were obliged under Hadrian to permanently move the Legio VI Ferrata into Caesarea Maritima in Judea. (en)
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  • Massive civilian casualties with some areas utterly annihilated, 460,000+ Roman citizens (largelyRoman Greeks) killed in Cyrene and Cyprus alone and unknown numbers inAegyptus,Libyaand the rest of theEastern Mediterranean
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  • Jewish/Judeanzealots
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  • Roman victory
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  • 2019-11-17 20:34:07Z (xsd:date)
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  • 2019-11-17 20:34:02Z (xsd:date)
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  • The Kitos War (115–117; Hebrew: מרד הגלויות‎: mered ha'galuyot or mered ha'tfutzot [מרד התפוצות]; translation: rebellion of the diaspora. Latin: Tumultus Iudaicus) was one of the major Jewish–Roman wars, 66–136. The rebellions erupted in the year 115, when a majority of the Roman armies were fighting Trajan's Parthian War on the eastern border of the Roman Empire. Major uprisings by ethnic Judeans in Cyrenaica, Cyprus and Egypt spiraled out of control, resulting in a widespread slaughter of left-behind Roman garrisons and Roman citizens by Jewish rebels. (en)
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  • Kitos War (en)
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  • or (en)
  • Kitos War (en)
  • Second Jewish–Roman War (en)
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