Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Law of the People's Republic of China, officially referred to as the Socialist legal system with Chinese characteristics, is the legal regime of China, with the separate legal traditions and systems of Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macau. During the Maoist period (1949 - 1978), the government had a hostile attitude towards a formalized legal system, because Mao and the CCP "saw the law as creating constraints upon their power.' The legal system was attacked as a counter-revolutionary institution and the concept of law itself was not accepted. Courts were closed, law schools were shut down and lawyers were forced to change professions or be sent to the countryside. There was an attempt in the mid-1950s to import a socialist legal system based on the Soviet Union. But from the start of the "anti-rightist" movement in 1957- 9 to the end of the Cultural Revolution around 1976 the PRC lacked most of the features of what could be described as a formal legal system. This policy was changed in 1979, and Deng Xiaoping and the CCP put into place an "open door" policy which took on a utilitarian policy to the reconstruction of the social structure and legal system where the law has been used as useful tool to support economic growth. Since then, China has continued to develop a formal legal system. A huge increase in the amount of legislation passed and the increased focus on implementing and enforcing law has allowed for a more stable legal environment compared to the Maoist period. The country is currently in a period of transition as its legal system continues to develop. Scholar Daniel C.K Chow describes the current system as following "rule by law" rather than "rule of law." China's legal system is largely a civil law system, reflecting the influence of Continental European legal systems, especially the German civil law system in the 19th and early 20th centuries. On the other hand, Hong Kong still retains the common law system inherited as a former British colony, and Macau employs a legal system based on that of Portuguese civil law. This is part of the One Country, Two Systems theory. They have their own courts of final appeal and extradition policies. As such, respectively, they are not within the jurisdiction of the court system within China, which is only effective within mainland China, but their respective Basic Laws are subject to interpretation by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-07-09 19:05:36Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 1440585 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 46095 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-07-09 19:05:30Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 150 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 905534568 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Law of the People's Republic of China, officially referred to as the Socialist legal system with Chinese characteristics, is the legal regime of China, with the separate legal traditions and systems of Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macau. There was an attempt in the mid-1950s to import a socialist legal system based on the Soviet Union. But from the start of the "anti-rightist" movement in 1957- 9 to the end of the Cultural Revolution around 1976 the PRC lacked most of the features of what could be described as a formal legal system. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Law of the People's Republic of China (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:sameAs
foaf:homepage
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:data of
is foaf:primaryTopic of