The U.S. city of Bellevue, Washington, is a suburb of Seattle with 31 high-rise buildings that are 230 feet (70 m) or taller in height. Downtown Bellevue developed into a high-rise office district in the 1970s and 1980s and continues to grow, with new residential buildings being introduced in the late 2000s. The tallest buildings in the city, measuring 450 feet (140 m) in height, are the 42-story Lincoln Tower One, W Hotel at Lincoln Square, and the 43-story Bellevue Towers Two. Lincoln Tower One was the first skyscraper to reach the city's 450-foot (140 m) height limit upon completion in 2005.

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  • The U.S. city of Bellevue, Washington, is a suburb of Seattle with 31 high-rise buildings that are 230 feet (70 m) or taller in height. Downtown Bellevue developed into a high-rise office district in the 1970s and 1980s and continues to grow, with new residential buildings being introduced in the late 2000s. The tallest buildings in the city, measuring 450 feet (140 m) in height, are the 42-story Lincoln Tower One, W Hotel at Lincoln Square, and the 43-story Bellevue Towers Two. Lincoln Tower One was the first skyscraper to reach the city's 450-foot (140 m) height limit upon completion in 2005. Bellevue's history of skyscrapers began with the completion of the in 1970; this structure is regarded as the city's first high-rise. High-rise building construction remained slow until 1982, when the city's first skyscraper building boom took shape. Eight of the city's 24 tallest buildings were completed within the next seven years, including City Center Bellevue, which was the tallest building in Bellevue for almost two decades. The skyscraper construction boom ended in 1989, and subsequently only one high-rise which ranked among the city's tallest structures was completed in the 1990s. Beginning in 2000, Bellevue entered into a second, much larger building boom that continued to 2010. More than half of Bellevue's twenty tallest buildings were completed after 2000; nine projects were completed in 2008 alone, including Bellevue Towers. Overall, Bellevue's skyline is ranked third in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, after Seattle and Portland. With the groundbreaking of the SoMa Towers project in 2012, the city entered another era of building construction. The largest of the recent developments under construction are the W Bellevue Hotel (500 Lincoln Square) and 400 Lincoln Square; both of these buildings constitute the southward expansion of Lincoln Square and stand approximately 450 feet (137 m) tall. Buildings exceeding the current 450-foot height limit have been proposed and the city raised height limits in 2017 to allow for 600-foot (180 m) buildings in some areas of the downtown core. As of 2015, there are 24 additional buildings under construction and planned for construction in Bellevue. (en)
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  • The U.S. city of Bellevue, Washington, is a suburb of Seattle with 31 high-rise buildings that are 230 feet (70 m) or taller in height. Downtown Bellevue developed into a high-rise office district in the 1970s and 1980s and continues to grow, with new residential buildings being introduced in the late 2000s. The tallest buildings in the city, measuring 450 feet (140 m) in height, are the 42-story Lincoln Tower One, W Hotel at Lincoln Square, and the 43-story Bellevue Towers Two. Lincoln Tower One was the first skyscraper to reach the city's 450-foot (140 m) height limit upon completion in 2005. (en)
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  • List of tallest buildings in Bellevue, Washington (en)
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