Cleveland, the second-largest city in the U.S. state of Ohio, is home to 142 completed high-rises, 36 of which stand taller than 250 feet (76 m). The tallest building in Cleveland is the 57-story Key Tower, which rises 947 feet (289 m) on Public Square. The tower has been the tallest building in the state of Ohio since its completion in 1991, and it also stood as the tallest building in the United States between Chicago and New York City prior to the 2007 completion of the Comcast Center in Philadelphia. The Terminal Tower, which at 771 feet (235 m) is the second-tallest building in the city and the state; at the time of its completion, the building was the tallest in the world outside New York City.

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  • Cleveland, the second-largest city in the U.S. state of Ohio, is home to 142 completed high-rises, 36 of which stand taller than 250 feet (76 m). The tallest building in Cleveland is the 57-story Key Tower, which rises 947 feet (289 m) on Public Square. The tower has been the tallest building in the state of Ohio since its completion in 1991, and it also stood as the tallest building in the United States between Chicago and New York City prior to the 2007 completion of the Comcast Center in Philadelphia. The Terminal Tower, which at 771 feet (235 m) is the second-tallest building in the city and the state; at the time of its completion, the building was the tallest in the world outside New York City. The history of skyscrapers in Cleveland began in 1889 with the construction of the Society for Savings Building, often regarded as the first skyscraper in the city. Cleveland went through an early building boom in the late 1920s and early 1930s, during which several high-rise buildings, including the Terminal Tower, were constructed. The city experienced a second, much larger building boom that lasted from the early 1970s to early 1990s, during which time it saw the construction of over 15 skyscrapers, including the Key Tower and 200 Public Square. Overall, the city is the site of three of the four Ohio skyscrapers that rise at least 656 feet (200 m) in height; Cincinnati contains the other. As of 2012, the skyline of Cleveland is 27th in the United States and 96th in the world with 16 buildings rising at least 330 feet (100 m) in height. Unlike many other major American cities, Cleveland was the site of relatively few skyscraper construction projects in the 2000s decade. The most recently completed skyscrapers in the city are the Carl B. Stokes Federal Court House Building, which was constructed in 2002 and rises 430 feet (131 m), the Ernst & Young Tower in 2013 which tops out at 330 feet (100 m), and the recently erected 374-foot-tall (114 m) Hilton Cleveland Downtown Hotel which opened in 2016. Overall, as of August 2016, there were 17 high-rise buildings under construction or proposed for construction in Cleveland. The most recent proposals have been for the 54-story NuCLEus building project in the Gateway Sports and Entertainment Complex district of downtown and the 34-story, 396-foot-tall (121 m) The LumenTower.The two tallest buildings under construction are the Lumen and the recently commenced 355-foot-tall (108 m) Beacon apartment building downtown on Euclid Avenue. (en)
  • Cleveland, the second-largest city in the U.S. state of Ohio, is home to 142 completed high-rises, 36 of which stand taller than 250 feet (76 m). The tallest building in Cleveland is the 57-story Key Tower, which rises 947 feet (289 m) on Public Square. The tower has been the tallest building in the state of Ohio since its completion in 1991, and it also stood as the tallest building in the United States between Chicago and New York City prior to the 2007 completion of the Comcast Center in Philadelphia. The Terminal Tower, which at 771 feet (235 m) is the second-tallest building in the city and the state; at the time of its completion, the building was the tallest in the world outside New York City. The history of skyscrapers in Cleveland began in 1889 with the construction of the Society for Savings Building, often regarded as the first skyscraper in the city. Cleveland went through an early building boom in the late 1920s and early 1930s, during which several high-rise buildings, including the Terminal Tower, were constructed. The city experienced a second, much larger building boom that lasted from the early 1970s to early 1990s, during which time it saw the construction of over 15 skyscrapers, including the Key Tower and 200 Public Square. Overall, the city is the site of three of the four Ohio skyscrapers that rise at least 656 feet (200 m) in height; Cincinnati contains the other. As of 2020, the skyline of Cleveland is 27th in the United States and 96th in the world with 18 buildings rising at least 330 feet (100 m) in height. Unlike many other major American cities, Cleveland was the site of relatively few skyscraper construction projects in the 2000s decade. The most recently completed skyscrapers in the city are the Carl B. Stokes Federal Court House Building, which was constructed in 2002 and rises 430 feet (131 m), the Ernst & Young Tower in 2013 which tops out at 330 feet (100 m), and the recently erected 374-foot-tall (114 m) Hilton Cleveland Downtown Hotel which opened in 2016. Overall, as of August 2016, there were 17 high-rise buildings under construction or proposed for construction in Cleveland. The most recent proposals have been for the 54-story NuCLEus building project in the Gateway Sports and Entertainment Complex district of downtown and the 34-story, 396-foot-tall (121 m) The LumenTower.The two tallest buildings under construction are the Lumen and the recently commenced 355-foot-tall (108 m) Beacon apartment building downtown on Euclid Avenue. (en)
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  • Cleveland, the second-largest city in the U.S. state of Ohio, is home to 142 completed high-rises, 36 of which stand taller than 250 feet (76 m). The tallest building in Cleveland is the 57-story Key Tower, which rises 947 feet (289 m) on Public Square. The tower has been the tallest building in the state of Ohio since its completion in 1991, and it also stood as the tallest building in the United States between Chicago and New York City prior to the 2007 completion of the Comcast Center in Philadelphia. The Terminal Tower, which at 771 feet (235 m) is the second-tallest building in the city and the state; at the time of its completion, the building was the tallest in the world outside New York City. (en)
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  • List of tallest buildings in Cleveland (en)
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