Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field.

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  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he refused to surrender to the advance of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. He contracted syphilis, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, he died on 1 October 1898, aged 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. He contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmadashankar Lalshankar Dave, Dalpatram Dahyabhai Travadi, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. He contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmadashankar Lalshankar Dave, Dalpatram Dahyabhai Travadi, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. He contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram Dahyabhai Travadi, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. He contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. He contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothel, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothel, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in this field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died on 1 October 1898 at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in this field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in this field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for political reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal appeared to be contradictory in his professions and performance. In his private life, he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for political reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era of Gujarati literature during which scholarly writing evolved. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for political reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era in which Gujarati literature expanded beyond religious forms to address social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era in which Gujarati literature expanded beyond religious forms to address social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Pandit Yuga, an era in which Gujarati literature expanded beyond religious forms to address social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era, during which which Gujarati literature expanded beyond religious forms to address social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which it expanded beyond religious forms to address social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which the largely religious writings of the previous era began to make room for contemporary topics such as social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which the largely religious writings of the previous era began to make room for contemporary topics such as social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which the largely religious writings of the previous era began to make room for contemporary topics such as social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer from British India. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which the largely religious writings of the previous era began to make room for contemporary topics such as social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer from British India. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which the largely religious writings of the previous era began to make room for contemporary topics such as social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. Manilal belongs to the Scholar Era of Gujarati literature during which the largely religious writings of the previous era began to make room for contemporary topics such as social welfare, Western literary genres, and new-age thinking. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His main works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thoughts. As he held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, he resisted the influence of Western civilisation and social reform. Manilal's private life was inconsistent with his professions: he indulged in unrestrained eroticism and promiscuous relationships. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children. Due to his visits to brothels, he contracted syphilis and, after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, but he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels, contracting syphilis as a result. After suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels, contracting syphilis as a result. After suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels. He contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels; he contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels; he contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer and philosopher from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with social reformers who held less conservative views. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels; he contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with social reformers who held less conservative views. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels; he contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with social reformers who held less conservative views. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored the traditional literature, culture and religion to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by the Western culture brought by the colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. He was invited to present a paper at the first Parliament of World Religions, held in Chicago in 1893, but he could not afford to go. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels; he contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, a position which drew him into conflicts with other social reformers of a less conservative outlook. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored their traditional literature, culture and religion in order to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was challenged by thye predominantly Western cultural model introduced under colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy was the fundamental underpinning of his philosophical thought. He was invited to present a paper at the first Parliament of World Religions, held in Chicago in 1893, but he could not afford to go. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels; he contracted syphilis as a result, and after suffering from serious bouts of illness throughout his life, died at the age of 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, a position which drew him into conflicts with other social reformers of a less conservative outlook. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga , or "Scholar Era" – an time in which Gujarati writers explored their traditional literature, culture and religion in order to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was subject to challenge from the influential Western model introduced under colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy provided the fundamental underpinning for his philosophical thought. He was invited to present a paper at the first Parliament of World Religions, held in Chicago in 1893, but financial considerations made his participation there impossible. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed by his experiences. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels, where he contracted syphilis. He suffered from frequent bouts of serious illnesses throughout his life and died prematurely at 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, a position which drew him into conflicts with other social reformers of a less conservative outlook. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". Manilal's writings belong to the Pandit Yuga, or "Scholar Era" – a time in which Gujarati writers explored their traditional literature, culture and religion in order to redefine contemporary Indian identity when it was subject to challenge from the influential Western model introduced under colonial rule. His works include Atmanimajjan, a collection of poems on the theme of love in the context of Advaita (non-duality) philosophy; Kanta, a play combining Sanskrit and English dramatic techniques; Nrusinhavatar, a play based on Sanskrit dramatic traditions; Pranavinimaya, a study of yoga and mysticism; and Siddhantasara, a historical critique of the world's religious philosophies. His faith in Shankara's Advaita philosophy provided the fundamental underpinning for his philosophical thought. He was invited to present a paper at the first Parliament of World Religions, held in Chicago in 1893, but financial considerations made his participation there impossible. Manilal's beliefs led him to search for perfection and love in his friendships with men and women, though he was often disappointed by his experiences. He married at the age of thirteen and had two children, but his wife left him in 1890. He had multiple sexual relationships with women, and also visited brothels, where he contracted syphilis. He suffered from frequent bouts of serious illnesses throughout his life and died prematurely at 40. Narmad, the founder of modern Gujarati literature, considered Manilal his intellectual heir. Manilal elaborated upon Narmad's line of thinking through his writings in the monthlies Priyamvada and Sudarshan, which he edited from 1885 until his death. (en)
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  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmadashankar Lalshankar Dave, Dalpatram Dahyabhai Travadi, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmadashankar Lalshankar Dave, Dalpatram Dahyabhai Travadi, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram Dahyabhai Travadi, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who set about to press for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [mɘnilal nəbʰubʰai dwivedɪ] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in this field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in this field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reforms and awareness of the problems their community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for political reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature and was the first graduate of Bombay University to be recognised in the field. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, Govardhanram Tripathi, Mansukhram Tripathi and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer from British India. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators, among them Narmad, Dalpatram, Karsandas Mulji, and Navalram Pandya, who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, editor and social reformer from British India. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India. Commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles, he influenced 19th-century Gujarati literature. He was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for reform and increased awareness of the problems the Gujurati community was facing. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators who campaigned for social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social reformer from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with other social reformers who held less conservative views. (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer and philosopher from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with social reformers who held less conservative views. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, leading him to conflicts with social reformers who held less conservative views. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". (en)
  • Manilal Nabhubhai Dwivedi (pronounced [məɲilal nəbʰubʰai dvivedi] (); 26 September 1858 – 1 October 1898) was a Gujarati-language writer, philosopher, and social thinker from British India, commonly referred to as Manilal in literary circles. He was an influential figure in 19th-century Gujarati literature, and was one of several Gujarati writers and educators involved in the debate over social reforms, focusing on issues such as the status of women, child marriage, and the question of whether widows could remarry. He held Eastern civilisation in high esteem, and resisted the influence of Western civilisation, a position which drew him into conflicts with other social reformers of a less conservative outlook. He considered himself a "reformer along religious lines". (en)
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