Minos (; Greek: Μίνως) is purported to be one of the dialogues of Plato. It features Socrates and a companion who together attempt to find a definition of "law" (Greek: νόμος, nómos). Despite its authenticity having been doubted by many scholars, it has often been regarded as a foundational document in the history of legal philosophy, particularly in the theory of natural law. It has also conversely been interpreted as describing a largely procedural theory of law. Ancient commentators have traditionally considered the work as a preamble to Plato's final dialogue, Laws.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Minos (; Greek: Μίνως) is purported to be one of the dialogues of Plato. It features Socrates and a companion who together attempt to find a definition of "law" (Greek: νόμος, nómos). Despite its authenticity having been doubted by many scholars, it has often been regarded as a foundational document in the history of legal philosophy, particularly in the theory of natural law. It has also conversely been interpreted as describing a largely procedural theory of law. Ancient commentators have traditionally considered the work as a preamble to Plato's final dialogue, Laws. (en)
dbo:author
dbo:country
dbo:language
dbo:nonFictionSubject
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-11-19 21:45:02Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 8508034 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 22404 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-11-19 21:44:54Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 77 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 927022720 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Minos (; Greek: Μίνως) is purported to be one of the dialogues of Plato. It features Socrates and a companion who together attempt to find a definition of "law" (Greek: νόμος, nómos). Despite its authenticity having been doubted by many scholars, it has often been regarded as a foundational document in the history of legal philosophy, particularly in the theory of natural law. It has also conversely been interpreted as describing a largely procedural theory of law. Ancient commentators have traditionally considered the work as a preamble to Plato's final dialogue, Laws. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Minos (dialogue) (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Minos (en)
  • Μίνως (en)
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is foaf:primaryTopic of