Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century. Old Norse was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them. For example, Old East Norse traits were found in eastern Norway, although Old Norwegian is classified as Old West Norse, and Old West Norse traits were found in western Sweden. Most speakers spoke Old East Norse in what is present day Denmark and Sweden. Old Gutnish, the more obscure dialectal branch, is sometimes included in the Old East Norse dialect due to geographical associations. It developed its own unique features and shared in changes to both other branches. The 12th-century Icelandic Gray Goose Laws state that Swedes, Norwegians, Icelanders, and Danes spoke the same language, dǫnsk tunga ("Danish tongue"; speakers of Old East Norse would have said dansk tunga). Another term, used especially commonly with reference to West Norse, was norrœnt mál or norrǿnt mál ("Nordic/Northern speech"). Today Old Norse has developed into the modern North Germanic languages Icelandic, Faroese (both inherited cases from the language), Norwegian, Danish, and Swedish, of which Norwegian, Danish and Swedish retain considerable mutual intelligibility. (en)
dbo:iso6392Code
  • non
dbo:iso6393Code
  • non
dbo:languageFamily
dbo:spokenIn
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-11-29 03:32:29Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 22666 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 91309 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-11-29 03:32:23Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 436 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 928431217 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:wordnet_type
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Old Norse (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:differentFrom
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Old Norse (en)
  • dǫnsk tunga ("Danish tongue") (en)
  • norrønt mál ("Nordic language") (en)
is dbo:academicDiscipline of
is dbo:language of
is dbo:languageFamily of
is dbo:nonFictionSubject of
is dbo:place of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:commonLanguages of
is dbp:language of
is dbp:languageorigin of
is dbp:nativeLang of
is dbp:origin of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is owl:differentFrom of
is foaf:primaryTopic of