The Ordnance QF 32 pounder or (32-pdr) was a British 94 mm gun, developed as a replacement for the Ordnance QF 17 pounder (17-pdr) anti tank and tank gun. Like the German 88 mm gun it was developed from an anti-aircraft (AA) gun, in this case the QF 3.7 inch AA gun. The 32-pdr fired a 32 lb armour-piercing shot at a muzzle velocity of 2,880 ft/s (877.8 m/s) and a 15.3lb Sabot (APDS) shell at a muzzle velocity of 5,050 ft/s (1,540 m/s).

Property Value
dbo:Weapon/weight
  • 2972.0
dbo:abstract
  • The Ordnance QF 32 pounder or (32-pdr) was a British 94 mm gun, developed as a replacement for the Ordnance QF 17 pounder (17-pdr) anti tank and tank gun. Like the German 88 mm gun it was developed from an anti-aircraft (AA) gun, in this case the QF 3.7 inch AA gun. Developed during the Second World War, the gun was used in the experimental Tortoise heavy tank. At least one 32-pdr was developed as an anti-tank gun on a wheeled carriage and a single example using a novel form of muzzle brake was installed in a de Haviland Mosquito as an up-gunned version of the 'Tsetse' Mosquito FB MkXVIII (instead of the 57 mm Molins gun). While flight trials did not take place until after the war, the aircraft flew and the gun fired without problems. The 32-pdr fired a 32 lb armour-piercing shot at a muzzle velocity of 2,880 ft/s (877.8 m/s) and a 15.3lb Sabot (APDS) shell at a muzzle velocity of 5,050 ft/s (1,540 m/s). The 32 pdr sabot (APDS) Mk.3 shell could penetrate 200mm/50° RHA (LOS 311mm) at the velocity of 1,487 m/s (the muzzle velocity was 1,540 m/s) during the test in 28 June 1945, which meant that its penetration was even far more than many early APFSDS. The front hull of the Konigstiger and Jagdtiger could be penetrated easily by the 32-pdr gun, and it would have been the only anti-tank gun that could do so in the Second World War. Meanwhile, the M308 HVAP (used in the 90mm M3 ant-tank gun) could only penetrate 114m at 50-degrees at 100 yards. Development was halted with the end of the war, and the 17-pdr was replaced with the 20-pdr for tank use and with the intention to develop guided weapons for infantry use. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:usedInWar
dbo:weight
  • 2972000.000000 (xsd:double)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-08-10 18:25:45Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 18493770 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 4291 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-08-10 18:25:41Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 31 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 910247439 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Ordnance QF 32 pounder or (32-pdr) was a British 94 mm gun, developed as a replacement for the Ordnance QF 17 pounder (17-pdr) anti tank and tank gun. Like the German 88 mm gun it was developed from an anti-aircraft (AA) gun, in this case the QF 3.7 inch AA gun. The 32-pdr fired a 32 lb armour-piercing shot at a muzzle velocity of 2,880 ft/s (877.8 m/s) and a 15.3lb Sabot (APDS) shell at a muzzle velocity of 5,050 ft/s (1,540 m/s). (en)
rdfs:label
  • Ordnance QF 32-pounder (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Ordnance QF 32-pounder (en)
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of