The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water.

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dbo:abstract
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000 - 5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st-22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick ice. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000 - 5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st-22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick ice. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000-5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st-22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick ice. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick ice. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are in the surrounding terrain. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two ice cores in 1983 which are the first ice cores obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are in the surrounding terrain. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states, including evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events, have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores. The ice cap is also regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and a weather station operates on it. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas; then with the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today until about 6,000–5,000 years ago, when a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st–22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking concomitant with human-caused global warming; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change, in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change, in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest around the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change, in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; between 6,000 and 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than today; around 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya Ice Cap (also known as Quenamari Ice Cap) is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than present-day; around 5,000 years ago, a Neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya Ice Cap (also known as Quenamari Ice Cap) is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first obtained outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than present-day; around 5,000 years ago, a neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines especially in the Huancané valley testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya Ice Cap (also known as Quenamari Ice Cap) is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first recovered outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene epoch. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas climate anomalies. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than present-day; around 5,000 years ago, a neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines ~- especially in the Huancané valley - testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand (area expansion) during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
  • The Quelccaya Ice Cap (also known as Quenamari Ice Cap) is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. A number of ice cores have been obtained from Quelccaya, including two from 1983 which were the first recovered outside of the polar regions. Past climate states have been reconstructed from data in these ice cores; these include evidence of the Little Ice Age, regional droughts and wet periods with historical significance and past and recent El Niño events. The ice cap is regularly monitored and has a weather station. Quelccaya was much larger in the past, merging with neighbouring glaciers during the Pleistocene epoch. A secondary expansion occurred during either the Antarctic Cold Reversal or the Younger Dryas climate anomalies. At the beginning of the Holocene the ice cap shrank to a size smaller than present-day; around 5,000 years ago, a neoglacial expansion began. A number of moraines – especially in the Huancané valley – testify to past expansions and changes of Quelccaya, although the chronology of individual moraines is often unclear. After reaching a secondary highstand (area expansion) during the Little Ice Age, Quelccaya has been shrinking due to human-caused climate change; in particular the Qori Kalis Glacier has been retreating significantly. Life and lakes have been occupying the terrain left by retreating ice; these lakes can be dangerous as they can cause floods when they breach. Climate models predict that without aggressive climate change mitigation measures, Quelccaya is likely to disappear during the 21st or 22nd century. (en)
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  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains of Peru, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick ice. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the ice cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick ice. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Water from Quelccaya eventually nourishes the Inambari River and the Vilcanota River and is an important source of water. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; the terrain surrounding the ice cap features lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands and features a rich flora and fauna, including birds which have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are in the surrounding terrain. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. A rich flora and fauna, including birds, have been observed to nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
  • The Peruvian Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest around the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
  • The Quelccaya (also known as Quenamari) Ice Cap is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
  • The Quelccaya Ice Cap (also known as Quenamari Ice Cap) is the second largest glaciated area in the tropics, after Coropuna. Located in the Cordillera Oriental section of the Andes mountains in Peru, the cap covers an area of 42.8 square kilometres (16.5 sq mi) with ice up to 200 metres (660 ft) thick. It is surrounded by tall ice cliffs and a number of outlet glaciers, the largest of which is known as Qori Kalis Glacier; lakes, moraines, peat bogs and wetlands are also present. There is a rich flora and fauna, including birds which nest on the ice cap. Quelccaya is an important source of water, eventually nourishing the Inambari and Vilcanota Rivers. (en)
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