Robert Monckton (24 June 1726 – 21 May 1782) was an officer of the British Army and also a colonial administrator in British North America. He had a distinguished military and political career, being second in command to General Wolfe at the battle of Quebec and later being named the Governor of the Province of New York. Monckton is also remembered for his role in a number of other important events in the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War), most notably the capture of Fort Beausejour in Acadia, and the island of Martinique in the West Indies, as well as for his role in the deportation of the Acadians from British controlled Nova Scotia and also from French-controlled Acadia (present-day New Brunswick). The city of Moncton, New Brunswick, (about 50 km

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Robert Monckton (24 June 1726 – 21 May 1782) was an officer of the British Army and also a colonial administrator in British North America. He had a distinguished military and political career, being second in command to General Wolfe at the battle of Quebec and later being named the Governor of the Province of New York. Monckton is also remembered for his role in a number of other important events in the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War), most notably the capture of Fort Beausejour in Acadia, and the island of Martinique in the West Indies, as well as for his role in the deportation of the Acadians from British controlled Nova Scotia and also from French-controlled Acadia (present-day New Brunswick). The city of Moncton, New Brunswick, (about 50 km west of Fort Beausejour) and Fort Monckton in Port Elgin, New Brunswick, are named for him. He sat in the British House of Commons between 1774 and 1782. Although never legally married, he raised and was survived by three sons and a daughter. (en)
dbo:battle
dbo:militaryCommand
  • 47th Regiment of Foot
  • Commander of British forces capturingMartinique
  • Commander of Fort Lawrence
  • Second in Command to GeneralJames WolfeatQuebec
  • Commander of British forces in the southern provinces
  • Commander of British expeditionary force toFort Beausejour
dbo:militaryUnit
dbo:occupation
dbo:serviceEndYear
  • 1782-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:serviceStartYear
  • 1741-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-06-06 07:09:03Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 2770166 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 23932 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-06-06 06:59:15Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 177 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 900528727 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:wordnet_type
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Robert Monckton (24 June 1726 – 21 May 1782) was an officer of the British Army and also a colonial administrator in British North America. He had a distinguished military and political career, being second in command to General Wolfe at the battle of Quebec and later being named the Governor of the Province of New York. Monckton is also remembered for his role in a number of other important events in the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War), most notably the capture of Fort Beausejour in Acadia, and the island of Martinique in the West Indies, as well as for his role in the deportation of the Acadians from British controlled Nova Scotia and also from French-controlled Acadia (present-day New Brunswick). The city of Moncton, New Brunswick, (about 50 km (en)
rdfs:label
  • Robert Monckton (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:gender
  • male (en)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Robert Monckton (en)
is dbo:commander of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:after of
is dbp:before of
is dbp:commander of
is dbp:predecessor of
is dbp:successor of
is foaf:primaryTopic of