Segodnya (Today, Russian: Сегодня) was a Russian-language newspaper published in Riga, Latvia from 1919 to 1940. Its editorial line was liberal and democratic. It had a comparatively well-developed network of foreign correspondents and extensive analysis of European affairs, making it popular amongst Russian émigrés, and thus the Russian newspaper with the largest circulation outside the USSR in the 1930s. A number of its staff and contributors came from Latvia's Jewish community, and perished in the Holocaust during Latvia's occupation by Nazi Germany in 1941–1944.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Segodnya (Today, Russian: Сегодня) was a Russian-language newspaper published in Riga, Latvia from 1919 to 1940. Its editorial line was liberal and democratic. It had a comparatively well-developed network of foreign correspondents and extensive analysis of European affairs, making it popular amongst Russian émigrés, and thus the Russian newspaper with the largest circulation outside the USSR in the 1930s. The newspaper was shut down by the Soviet authorities following the occupation and annexation of Latvia by the USSR in 1940. Due to the paper's editorial line critical of Soviet communism, a number of the persons connected with Segodnya were singled out for persecution by the NKVD. A number of its staff and contributors came from Latvia's Jewish community, and perished in the Holocaust during Latvia's occupation by Nazi Germany in 1941–1944. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-04-27 10:05:04Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 13090167 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 2302 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-04-27 10:04:59Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 20 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 953460083 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Segodnya (Today, Russian: Сегодня) was a Russian-language newspaper published in Riga, Latvia from 1919 to 1940. Its editorial line was liberal and democratic. It had a comparatively well-developed network of foreign correspondents and extensive analysis of European affairs, making it popular amongst Russian émigrés, and thus the Russian newspaper with the largest circulation outside the USSR in the 1930s. A number of its staff and contributors came from Latvia's Jewish community, and perished in the Holocaust during Latvia's occupation by Nazi Germany in 1941–1944. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Segodnya (1919) (en)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
owl:sameAs
is foaf:primaryTopic of