The Siege of Louisbourg took place in 1745 when a New England colonial force aided by a British fleet captured Louisbourg, the capital of the French province of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island) during the War of the Austrian Succession, known as King George's War in the British colonies.Louisbourg was a standing menace to all the Northern British colonies. It was such a haunt of privateers that it was called the American Dunkirk.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The Siege of Louisbourg took place in 1745 when a New England colonial force aided by a British fleet captured Louisbourg, the capital of the French province of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island) during the War of the Austrian Succession, known as King George's War in the British colonies.Louisbourg was a standing menace to all the Northern British colonies. It was such a haunt of privateers that it was called the American Dunkirk. It commanded the chief entrance of Canada, and threatened to ruin the fisheries, which were nearly as vital to New England as was the fur-trade to New France. The French government had spent twenty-five years in fortifying it, and the cost of its powerful defences...was reckoned at thirty million livres.Although the Fortress of Louisbourg's construction and layout was acknowledged as having superior seaward defences, a series of low rises behind them provided attackers places to erect siege batteries. The fort's garrison was poorly paid and supplied, and its inexperienced leaders mistrusted them. The colonial attackers were also lacking in experience, but ultimately succeeded in gaining control of the surrounding defences. The defenders surrendered in the face of an imminent assault.Louisbourg was an important bargaining chip in the peace negotiations to end the war, since it represented a major British success. Factions within the British government were opposed to returning it to the French as part of any peace agreement, but these were eventually overruled, and Louisbourg was returned, over the objections of the victorious indians, to French control after the 1748 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. (en)
  • The Siege of Louisbourg took place in 1745 when a New England colonial force aided by a British fleet captured Louisbourg, the capital of the French province of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island) during the War of the Austrian Succession, known as King George's War in the British colonies.Louisbourg was a standing menace to all the Northern British colonies. It was such a haunt of privateers that it was called the American Dunkirk. It commanded the chief entrance of Canada, and threatened to ruin the fisheries, which were nearly as vital to New England as was the fur-trade to New France. The French government had spent twenty-five years in fortifying it, and the cost of its defenses was reckoned at thirty million livres.Although the Fortress of Louisbourg's construction and layout was acknowledged as having superior seaward defences, a series of low rises behind them provided attackers places to erect siege batteries. The fort's garrison was poorly paid and supplied, and its inexperienced leaders mistrusted them. The colonial attackers were also lacking in experience, but ultimately succeeded in gaining control of the surrounding defences. The defenders surrendered in the face of an imminent assault.Louisbourg was an important bargaining chip in the peace negotiations to end the war, since it represented a major British success. Factions within the British government were opposed to returning it to the French as part of any peace agreement, but these were eventually overruled, and Louisbourg was returned, over the objections of the victorious indians, to French control after the 1748 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. (en)
  • The Siege of Louisbourg took place in 1745 when a New England colonial force aided by a British fleet captured Louisbourg, the capital of the French province of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island) during the War of the Austrian Succession, known as King George's War in the British colonies.Louisbourg was a standing menace to all the Northern British colonies. It was such a haunt of privateers that it was called the American Dunkirk. It commanded the chief entrance of Canada, and threatened to ruin the fisheries, which were nearly as vital to New England as was the fur-trade to New France. The French government had spent twenty-five years in fortifying it, and the cost of its defenses was reckoned at thirty million livres.Although the Fortress of Louisbourg's construction and layout was acknowledged as having superior seaward defences, a series of low rises behind them provided attackers places to erect siege batteries. The fort's garrison was poorly paid and supplied, and its inexperienced leaders mistrusted them. The colonial attackers were also lacking in experience, but ultimately succeeded in gaining control of the surrounding defences. The defenders surrendered in the face of an imminent assault.Louisbourg was an important bargaining chip in the peace negotiations to end the war, since it represented a major British success. Factions within the British government were opposed to returning it to the French as part of any peace agreement, but these were eventually overruled, and Louisbourg was returned, over the objections of the victorious Indians, to French control after the 1748 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. (en)
  • The Siege of Louisbourg took place in 1745 when a New England colonial force aided by a British fleet captured Louisbourg, the capital of the French province of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island) during the War of the Austrian Succession, known as King George's War in the British colonies.Louisbourg was a standing menace to all the Northern British colonies. It was such a haunt of privateers that it was called the American Dunkirk. The French and the Wabanaki Confederacy continuously attacked Northern New England in numerous Northeast Coast Campaigns (See the Northeast Coast Campaigns 1688, 1703, 1723, 1724). The Fortress also commanded the chief entrance of Canada, and threatened to ruin the fisheries, which were nearly as vital to New England as was the fur-trade to New France. The French government had spent twenty-five years in fortifying it, and the cost of its defenses was reckoned at thirty million livres.Although the Fortress of Louisbourg's construction and layout was acknowledged as having superior seaward defences, a series of low rises behind them made the Fortress vulnerable to a land-attack. The low rises provided attackers places to erect siege batteries. The fort's garrison was poorly paid and supplied, and its inexperienced leaders mistrusted them. The colonial attackers were also lacking in experience, but ultimately succeeded in gaining control of the surrounding defences. The defenders surrendered in the face of an imminent assault.Louisbourg was an important bargaining chip in the peace negotiations to end the war, since it represented a major British success. Factions within the British government were opposed to returning it to the French as part of any peace agreement, but these were eventually overruled, and Louisbourg was returned, over the objections of the victorious British North Americans, to French control after the 1748 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. (en)
dbo:causalties
  • 100 killed or wounded
  • 900 died of disease
dbo:combatant
  • *British America
dbo:commander
dbo:date
  • 1745-06-28 (xsd:date)
dbo:isPartOfMilitaryConflict
dbo:place
dbo:result
  • British victory
dbo:strength
  • 90 ships & vessels
  • 900 troops & marines
  • 4,200provincial troops, sailors & marines
  • 900 militia; 590 soldiers, 900 civilians,
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2018-05-06 14:57:45Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-03-31 16:02:40Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 15536451 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 33045 (xsd:integer)
  • 35237 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2018-04-06 16:53:55Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-03-31 15:56:37Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 162 (xsd:integer)
  • 166 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 835113269 (xsd:integer)
  • 890313889 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:campaignbox
  • King George's War (en)
dbp:caption
  • The landing of troops from New England on the island of Cape Breton to attack Louisbourg. (en)
dbp:casualties
  • 50 (xsd:integer)
  • 100 (xsd:integer)
  • 300 (xsd:integer)
  • 900 (xsd:integer)
  • 1400 (xsd:integer)
dbp:combatant
  • * British America (en)
dbp:commander
  • Louis Du Pont Duchambon (en)
  • Peter Warren (en)
  • Pierre Morpain (en)
  • William Pepperrell (en)
  • John Bradstreet (en)
  • Joseph Marin de la Malgue (en)
  • Edward Tyng (en)
dbp:conflict
  • Siege of Louisbourg (en)
dbp:date
  • --05-11
dbp:imageSize
  • 300 (xsd:integer)
dbp:partof
dbp:place
  • Louisbourg, Île-Royale (en)
dbp:result
  • British victory (en)
dbp:strength
  • 90 (xsd:integer)
  • 900 (xsd:integer)
  • 4200 (xsd:integer)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
georss:point
  • 45.92138888888889 -59.97027777777778
  • 45.92138888888889 -59.97027777777778
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Siege of Louisbourg took place in 1745 when a New England colonial force aided by a British fleet captured Louisbourg, the capital of the French province of Île-Royale (present-day Cape Breton Island) during the War of the Austrian Succession, known as King George's War in the British colonies.Louisbourg was a standing menace to all the Northern British colonies. It was such a haunt of privateers that it was called the American Dunkirk. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Siege of Louisbourg (1745) (en)
owl:differentFrom
owl:sameAs
geo:geometry
  • POINT(-59.970275878906 45.921390533447)
  • POINT(-59.970275878906 45.921390533447)
geo:lat
  • 45.921391 (xsd:float)
  • 45.921391 (xsd:float)
geo:long
  • -59.970276 (xsd:float)
  • -59.970276 (xsd:float)
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Siege of Louisbourg (en)
is dbo:battle of
is dbo:knownFor of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:battles of
is dbp:knownFor of
is owl:differentFrom of
is foaf:primaryTopic of