Tengrism, also known as Tengriism, Tenggerism, or Tengrianism, is ancient and medieval Central Asian–Eurasian Steppe sky god Tengri-centered state religion as well a number of the modern Turko-Mongolic native religious movements and teachings. It was the prevailing religion of the Turks with Mongols (including Bulgars, Huns, Xiongnu), and, possibly, the Manchus and Magyars, as the religion of the several medieval states: Göktürk Khaganate, Western Turkic Khaganate, Eastern Turkic Khaganate, Old Great Bulgaria, Danube Bulgaria, Volga Bulgaria, and Eastern Tourkia (Khazaria). In Irk Bitig, Tengri is mentioned as Türük Tängrisi (God of Turks). According to many academics, at the imperial level, especially by the 12th–13th centuries, Tengrism was a monotheistic religion; most contemporary Teng

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Tengrism, also known as Tengriism, Tenggerism, or Tengrianism, is ancient and medieval Central Asian–Eurasian Steppe sky god Tengri-centered state religion as well a number of the modern Turko-Mongolic native religious movements and teachings. It was the prevailing religion of the Turks with Mongols (including Bulgars, Huns, Xiongnu), and, possibly, the Manchus and Magyars, as the religion of the several medieval states: Göktürk Khaganate, Western Turkic Khaganate, Eastern Turkic Khaganate, Old Great Bulgaria, Danube Bulgaria, Volga Bulgaria, and Eastern Tourkia (Khazaria). In Irk Bitig, Tengri is mentioned as Türük Tängrisi (God of Turks). According to many academics, at the imperial level, especially by the 12th–13th centuries, Tengrism was a monotheistic religion; most contemporary Tengrists present it as the monotheistic too. The forms of the name Tengri (Old Turkic: Täŋri‎) among the ancient and modern Turks and Mongols are Tengeri, Tangara, Tangri, Tanri, Tangre, Tegri, Tingir, Tenkri, Teri, Ter, and Ture. The name Tengri ("the Sky") is derived from Old Turkic: Tenk‎ ("daybreak") or Tan ("dawn"). Mongolia is sometimes poetically called the "Land of Eternal Blue Sky" (Munkh Khukh Tengriin Oron) by its inhabitants. Tengrism has been advocated in intellectual circles of the Turkic nations of Central Asia (Kyrgyzstan with Kazakhstan) and Russia (Tatarstan, Bashkortostan) since the dissolution of the Soviet Union during the 1990s. Still practiced, it is undergoing an organized revival in Buryatia, Sakha (Yakutia), Khakassia, Tuva and other Turkic nations in Siberia. Altaian Burkhanism and Chuvash Vattisen Yaly are movements similar to Tengrism. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2020-01-25 14:03:56Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 4504155 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 77236 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2020-01-25 14:03:50Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 269 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 937512489 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Tengrism, also known as Tengriism, Tenggerism, or Tengrianism, is ancient and medieval Central Asian–Eurasian Steppe sky god Tengri-centered state religion as well a number of the modern Turko-Mongolic native religious movements and teachings. It was the prevailing religion of the Turks with Mongols (including Bulgars, Huns, Xiongnu), and, possibly, the Manchus and Magyars, as the religion of the several medieval states: Göktürk Khaganate, Western Turkic Khaganate, Eastern Turkic Khaganate, Old Great Bulgaria, Danube Bulgaria, Volga Bulgaria, and Eastern Tourkia (Khazaria). In Irk Bitig, Tengri is mentioned as Türük Tängrisi (God of Turks). According to many academics, at the imperial level, especially by the 12th–13th centuries, Tengrism was a monotheistic religion; most contemporary Teng (en)
rdfs:label
  • Tengrism (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:homepage
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:region of
is dbo:religion of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:religion of
is dbp:religions of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is foaf:primaryTopic of