In certain theories of linguistics, thematic relations, also known as semantic roles, are the various roles that a noun phrase may play with respect to the action or state described by a governing verb, commonly the sentence's main verb. For example, in the sentence "Susan ate an apple", Susan is the doer of the eating, so she is an agent; the apple is the item that is eaten, so it is a patient.While most modern linguistic theories make reference to such relations in one form or another, the general term, as well as the terms for specific relations, varies:"participant role", "semantic role", and "deep case" have also been employed with similar sense.

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  • In certain theories of linguistics, thematic relations, also known as semantic roles, are the various roles that a noun phrase may play with respect to the action or state described by a governing verb, commonly the sentence's main verb. For example, in the sentence "Susan ate an apple", Susan is the doer of the eating, so she is an agent; the apple is the item that is eaten, so it is a patient.While most modern linguistic theories make reference to such relations in one form or another, the general term, as well as the terms for specific relations, varies:"participant role", "semantic role", and "deep case" have also been employed with similar sense. (en)
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  • In certain theories of linguistics, thematic relations, also known as semantic roles, are the various roles that a noun phrase may play with respect to the action or state described by a governing verb, commonly the sentence's main verb. For example, in the sentence "Susan ate an apple", Susan is the doer of the eating, so she is an agent; the apple is the item that is eaten, so it is a patient.While most modern linguistic theories make reference to such relations in one form or another, the general term, as well as the terms for specific relations, varies:"participant role", "semantic role", and "deep case" have also been employed with similar sense. (en)
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  • Thematic relation (en)
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