Turkic mythology embraces Tengriist and Shamanist as well as many cultural and social subjects being a nomad folk. Later, especially after Turkic migration, some of the myths were decorated with Islamic symbols. It has numerous common points with Mongol mythology and both of them were probably originated in a proto-syncretic Tibetan Buddhist and nationalist mythology. Turkic mythology was influenced by other local mythologies. For example, in Tatar mythology elements of Finnic and Indo-European mythologies co-exist. Subjects from Tatar mythology include Äbädä, Alara, Şüräle, Şekä, Pitsen, Tulpar, and Zilant. Turks apparently practised all major religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism and Manichaeism, before the majority of Turks confessed to Islam. Turks often syncretised the ot

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  • Turkic mythology embraces Tengriist and Shamanist as well as many cultural and social subjects being a nomad folk. Later, especially after Turkic migration, some of the myths were decorated with Islamic symbols. It has numerous common points with Mongol mythology and both of them were probably originated in a proto-syncretic Tibetan Buddhist and nationalist mythology. Turkic mythology was influenced by other local mythologies. For example, in Tatar mythology elements of Finnic and Indo-European mythologies co-exist. Subjects from Tatar mythology include Äbädä, Alara, Şüräle, Şekä, Pitsen, Tulpar, and Zilant. Turks apparently practised all major religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism and Manichaeism, before the majority of Turks confessed to Islam. Turks often syncretised the other religions into their prevailing mythological understanding. Irk Bitig, a 10th-century manuscript found in Dunhuang is one of the most important sources for Turkic mythology and religion. The book is written in Old Turkic alphabet like the Orkhon inscriptions. (en)
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  • Turkic mythology embraces Tengriist and Shamanist as well as many cultural and social subjects being a nomad folk. Later, especially after Turkic migration, some of the myths were decorated with Islamic symbols. It has numerous common points with Mongol mythology and both of them were probably originated in a proto-syncretic Tibetan Buddhist and nationalist mythology. Turkic mythology was influenced by other local mythologies. For example, in Tatar mythology elements of Finnic and Indo-European mythologies co-exist. Subjects from Tatar mythology include Äbädä, Alara, Şüräle, Şekä, Pitsen, Tulpar, and Zilant. Turks apparently practised all major religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism and Manichaeism, before the majority of Turks confessed to Islam. Turks often syncretised the ot (en)
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  • Turkic mythology (en)
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