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A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has origin in 16th-century France. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group who follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/ or /hjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a member of a French Protestant denomination with origins in the 16th or 17th centuries. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin (Jean Cauvin in French) in the 1530s, who became known by that originally derisive designation by the end of the 16th century. The majority of Huguenots endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism. Hans J. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th century France. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a designation for an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants that follow the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant who follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin to 16th century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin.
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Huguenot
dbo:abstract
A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/ or /hjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a member of a French Protestant denomination with origins in the 16th or 17th centuries. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin (Jean Cauvin in French) in the 1530s, who became known by that originally derisive designation by the end of the 16th century. The majority of Huguenots endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism. Hans J. Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism: 4-volume Set claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and central parts of France, about one-eighth the number of French Roman Catholics. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of increasingly liberal political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, signed probably on 30 April 1598, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Renewed religious warfare in the 1620s caused the political and military privileges of the Huguenots to be abolished following their defeat. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV, who progressively increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), which abolished all legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forced the Huguenots to convert. While nearly three-quarters eventually were killed or submitted, roughly 500,000 Huguenots had fled France by the early 18th century.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant European nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread beyond Europe to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.Persecution of Protestants diminished in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.Today, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities in Alsace and the Cévennes in France and a diaspora of Huguenots in England and French Australians still retain their Huguenot religious tradition. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant who follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. Huguenots endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to largely German Lutheran population in Alsace, Moselle, and around Montbéliard. Hans J. Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism: 4-volume Set claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges; they retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, now tiny minority of Huguenots remained, and faced continued persecution under Louis XV. Persecution of Protestants diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a designation for an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants that follow the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7–8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The Huguenots were led by Jeanne d'Albret, her son, the future Henry IV, and the princes of Condé. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7–8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin to 16th century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin. Huguenots and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7–8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin. Huguenots and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant who follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. Huguenots endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, as opposed to largely German Lutheran population in Alsace, Moselle, and around Montbéliard. Hans J. Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism: 4-volume Set claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges; they retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, now tiny minority of Huguenots remained, and faced continued persecution under Louis XV. Persecution of Protestants diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group who follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. Huguenots endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to largely German Lutheran population in Alsace, Moselle, and around Montbéliard. Hans J. Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism: 4-volume Set claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges; they retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, now tiny minority of Huguenots remained, and faced continued persecution under Louis XV. Persecution of Protestants diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has origin in 16th-century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7–8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term traces back its origin to 16th century France. Historically, Huguenots were French Protestants inspired by the writings of John Calvin. Huguenots endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to largely German Lutheran population in Alsace, Moselle, and around Montbéliard. Hans J. Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism: 4-volume Set claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges; they retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, now tiny minority of Huguenots remained, and faced continued persecution under Louis XV. Persecution of Protestants diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7–8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)no]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th-century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7–8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The Huguenots were led by Jeanne d'Albret, her son, the future Henry IV, and the princes of Condé. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation. A Huguenot (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/, /ˈhjuːɡənoʊ/ or /ˌhjuːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡ(ə)nõ]) is a designation for a French Protestant or ethnoreligious group that follows the Reformed tradition.It was used frequently to describe members of the French Reformed Church until the beginning of the 19th century. The term has its origin in 16th century France. Huguenots were French Protestants who were inspired by the writings of John Calvin and endorsed the Reformed tradition of Protestantism, contrary to the largely German Lutheran population of Alsace, Moselle, and Montbéliard. Hans Hillerbrand in his Encyclopedia of Protestantism claims the Huguenot community reached as much as 10% of the French population on the eve of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre, declining to 7-8% by the end of the 16th century, and further after heavy persecution began once again with the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV of France.Huguenot numbers peaked near an estimated two million by 1562, concentrated mainly in the southern and western parts of France. As Huguenots gained influence and more openly displayed their faith, Catholic hostility grew, in spite of political concessions and edicts of toleration from the French crown. A series of religious conflicts followed, known as the French Wars of Religion, fought intermittently from 1562 to 1598. The wars finally ended with the granting of the Edict of Nantes, which granted the Huguenots substantial religious, political, and military autonomy.Huguenot rebellions in the 1620s prompted the abolishment of their political and military privileges. They retained the religious provisions of the Edict of Nantes until the rule of Louis XIV. Louis XIV gradually increased persecution of them until he issued the Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), ending any legal recognition of Protestantism in France, and forcing the Huguenots to convert or flee in a wave of violent dragonnades. Louis XIV claimed the French Huguenot population of 800,000 to 900,000 individuals was reduced to 1,000 or 1,500 individuals; a huge overestimate, although dragonnades were indeed the most devastating event for the minority. Nevertheless, a tiny minority of Huguenots remained and faced continued persecution under Louis XV, although it diminished significantly in France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and then after the death of Louis XV in 1774. It officially ended with the Edict of Versailles, commonly called the Edict of Tolerance, signed by Louis XVI in 1787. Two years later, with the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1789, Protestants gained equal rights as citizens.The bulk of Huguenot émigrés relocated to Protestant nations such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg and Electorate of the Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire, the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands, and Ireland. They also spread to the Dutch Cape Colony in South Africa, the Dutch East Indies, the Caribbean, New Netherland, several of the English colonies in North America, a small contingent of families to Russia, and Quebec, where they were generally accepted and allowed to worship freely.In the 21st century, most Huguenots have been assimilated into various societies and cultures, but remnant communities of Camisards in the Cévennes and French members of the largely German Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, as well as Huguenot diaspora in England and Australia still retain their beliefs, and Huguenot designation.
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