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ARM, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. ARM (previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine; originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. ARM Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. |name = Arm architectures|image = Arm logo 2017.svg|image_size = 200px|caption = The Arm logo|designer = Arm Holdings|bits = 32-bit, 64-bit|introduced = 1985|design = RISC|type = Register-Register|branching = Condition code, compare and branch|open = Proprietary}} ARM (previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine; originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Arm, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. C Machine and originally Acorn RISC Machine) for , configured for various environments. develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including (SoC) and (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs that implement this and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portabt‌ processors produced ARM (previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine and originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), currently known as Advanced RISC Machine (originally known as Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. ARM (stylized in lowercase as arm, previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine and originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), currently known as Advanced RISC Machine (originally known as Acorn RISC Machine), is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products.
rdfs:label
ARM architecture
rdfs:seeAlso
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dbo:abstract
ARM (stylized in lowercase as arm, previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine and originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions ARMv3 to ARMv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-ARMv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the ARMv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent ARM CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. ARM Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. ARM Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion ARM processors produced, as of 2019, ARM is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), currently known as Advanced RISC Machine (originally known as Acorn RISC Machine), is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. ARM (previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine and originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions ARMv3 to ARMv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-ARMv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the ARMv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent ARM CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. ARM Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. ARM Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion ARM processors produced, as of 2019, ARM is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. ARM will soon be purchased by NVIDIA. Arm, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. C Machine and originally Acorn RISC Machine) for , configured for various environments. develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including (SoC) and (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs that implement this and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portabt‌ which consume large amounts electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versionsupportmade befor Holdings bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both nstructions for improved . Some older cores can also Neoversebeing able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance or automotive applications is also a system processors produced cores, and specialized cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. Arm (previously officially written all caps as ARM and usually written as such today), currently known as Advanced RISC Machine (originally known as Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. ARM (previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine; originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. ARM Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution. ARM Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions ARMv3 to ARMv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-ARMv3 chips, made before ARM Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the ARMv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent ARM CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. ARM Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. ARM Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion ARM processors produced, as of 2019, ARM is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. ARM (previously an acronym for Advanced RISC Machine; originally Acorn RISC Machine) is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions ARMv3 to ARMv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-ARMv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the ARMv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent ARM CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. ARM Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. ARM Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion ARM processors produced, as of 2019, ARM is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. Arm, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. |name = Arm architectures|image = Arm logo 2017.svg|image_size = 200px|caption = The Arm logo|designer = Arm Holdings|bits = 32-bit, 64-bit|introduced = 1985|design = RISC|type = Register-Register|branching = Condition code, compare and branch|open = Proprietary}} Arm, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, Arm is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions Armv3 to Armv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-Armv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the Armv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. Arm Neoverse E1 being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. Arm Cortex-A65AE for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion Arm processors produced, as of 2019, Arm is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. ARM, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions ARMv3 to ARMv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-ARMv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the ARMv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion ARM processors produced, , ARM is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities. ARM, previously Advanced RISC Machine, originally Acorn RISC Machine, is a family of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures for computer processors, configured for various environments. Arm Holdings develops the architecture and licenses it to other companies, who design their own products that implement one of those architectures‍—‌including systems-on-chips (SoC) and systems-on-modules (SoM) that incorporate memory, interfaces, radios, etc. It also designs cores that implement this instruction set and licenses these designs to a number of companies that incorporate those core designs into their own products. Processors that have a RISC architecture typically require fewer transistors than those with a complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture (such as the x86 processors found in most personal computers), which improves cost, power consumption, and heat dissipation. These characteristics are desirable for light, portable, battery-powered devices‍—‌including smartphones, laptops and tablet computers, and other embedded systems‍—‌but are also useful for servers and desktops to some degree. For supercomputers, which consume large amounts of electricity, ARM is also a power-efficient solution. Arm Holdings periodically releases updates to the architecture. Architecture versions ARMv3 to ARMv7 support 32-bit address space (pre-ARMv3 chips, made before Arm Holdings was formed, as used in the Acorn Archimedes, had 26-bit address space) and 32-bit arithmetic; most architectures have 32-bit fixed-length instructions. The Thumb version supports a variable-length instruction set that provides both 32- and 16-bit instructions for improved code density. Some older cores can also provide hardware execution of Java bytecodes; and newer ones have one instruction for JavaScript. Released in 2011, the ARMv8-A architecture added support for a 64-bit address space and 64-bit arithmetic with its new 32-bit fixed-length instruction set. Some recent Arm CPUs have simultaneous multithreading (SMT) with e.g. being able to execute two threads concurrently for improved aggregate throughput performance. for automotive applications is also a multithreaded processor, and has Dual Core Lock-Step for fault-tolerant designs (supporting Automotive Safety Integrity Level D, the highest level). The Neoverse N1 is designed for "as few as 8 cores" or "designs that scale from 64 to 128 N1 cores within a single coherent system". With over 130 billion ARM processors produced, as of 2019, ARM is the most widely used instruction set architecture (ISA) and the ISA produced in the largest quantity. Currently, the widely used Cortex cores, older "classic" cores, and specialized SecurCore cores variants are available for each of these to include or exclude optional capabilities.
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